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"Let Loose The Dogs": Messiness And Ethical Wrangling In Toni Morrison's Tar Baby, Faith M. Avery 2014 University of Iowa

"Let Loose The Dogs": Messiness And Ethical Wrangling In Toni Morrison's Tar Baby, Faith M. Avery

Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies

This paper metatextextually explores Toni Morrison’s 1981 Tar Baby and its female protagonist – a black model named Jadine Childs – by way of the text’s correlation with the Supermodel Phenomenon of the late 1970s and the early ’80s alongside social and political issues related to notions of post civil rights era racial arrival, success, and “selling out.” This argument draws a correlation between the experiences of the fictional Jadine and the internationally renowned supermodel Iman Abdulmajid whose career began in 1975. While this parallel is central to this essay’s execution, this article’s trajectory is informed and complicated ...


Streams In The Wilderness, Miranda Beale 2014 Liberty University

Streams In The Wilderness, Miranda Beale

The Kabod

Miranda Beale analyzes two award-winning novels by Marilynne Robinson, Gilead (2004) and Home (2008), identifying their major themes as the necessity of balancing parental responsibility and God's loving guidance and redemptive power in raising children.


Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee 2014 Gettysburg College

Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

Although most Anglo-Saxonists deal with Old English texts and contexts as a matter of course in our research agendas, many of us teach relatively few specialized courses focused on our areas of expertise to highly-trained students; thus, many Old English texts and objects which are commonplace in our research lives can seem arcane and esoteric to a great many of our students. This article proposes to confront this gap, to suggest some ways of teaching a few potentially obscure texts and artifacts to undergrads, to offer some guidance about uses of technology in this endeavor, and to help fellow teachers ...


“Their Song Filled The Whole Night”: Not Without Laughter, Hinterlands Jazz, And Rural Modernity, Andy Oler 2014 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

“Their Song Filled The Whole Night”: Not Without Laughter, Hinterlands Jazz, And Rural Modernity, Andy Oler

Publications

This essay reads the rural Midwest as a modern space in which the sounds and material apparatus of early-twentieth-century jazz music compose the cultural field of Langston Hughes’s 1930 novel Not Without Laughter. It argues that Not Without Laughter does not attempt to supplant the more conventional urban modernities of Harlem and Chicago. Rather, the novel constructs a rural alternative that forms ambivalence through accumulation, both filling and exceeding the novel’s spaces and the experiences of its characters. Approaching Hughes’s novel through the sonic ambivalences of modern rurality evidences how some authors transgressed the supposed boundaries of ...


"Jesus Thrown Everything Off Balance": Grace And Redemption In Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard To Find", Abbie C. Harris 2014 University of North Georgia

"Jesus Thrown Everything Off Balance": Grace And Redemption In Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard To Find", Abbie C. Harris

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

By creating flawed, hypocritical, and sometimes mad characters, Flannery O’Connor demonstrates the religious decay of the South in her short story “A Good Man is Hard to Find.” While they appear to be quite different on the surface, Grandma and The Misfit are both the same at the core: sinners in need of Christ’s redemption. The Misfit is blatantly sinful and enraged at the concept of God’s grace, and Grandma masks her sinfulness with respectability and chooses to treat God as something that she can accept or ignore depending on her situation, a common practice of “good ...


Romantic Rhetoric And Appropriation In William Apess’S A Son Of The Forest, Courtney Hilden 2014 University of New Orleans

Romantic Rhetoric And Appropriation In William Apess’S A Son Of The Forest, Courtney Hilden

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Since the 1992 republication of On Our Own Ground: The Complete Writings of William Apess, a Pequot, most academic work on Apess has focused on his Methodism, his Native American identity, or the intersection between these two parts of his life and work. Dr. Tim Fulford is the only scholar to have written about Apess and Romanticism. In his book Romantic Indians: Native Americans, British Literature, and Transatlantic Culture, 1756-1830, Fulford illustrates the elegiac modes often present in the work of Apess. This thesis will examine William Apess’ Son of the Forest as an expression of early nineteenth century American ...


Framing Identity: Repudiating The Ideal In Chicana Literature, Michael A. Flores 2014 Northern Michigan University

Framing Identity: Repudiating The Ideal In Chicana Literature, Michael A. Flores

All NMU Master's Theses

In the 1960s Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzalez penned his now canonical, epic poem “I Am Joaquin.” The poem chronicles the historic oppression of a transnational, Mexican people as well as revolutionary acts of their forefathers in resisting tyranny. Coinciding with a series of renewed, sociopolitical campaigns, collectively known as the Chicano Movement, Gonzales’ poem uses vivid imagery to present an idealized representation of Chicanos and encouraged his reader to engage in revolutionary action. Though the poem encourages strong leadership, upward mobility, and political engagement the representations of women in his text are misogynistic and limiting.

His presentation of the “black-shawled Faithful ...


The Influence Of Literacy On The Lives Of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures, Laura Leighann Dicks 2014 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

The Influence Of Literacy On The Lives Of Twentieth Century Southern Female Minority Figures, Laura Leighann Dicks

Theses and Dissertations

The American South has long been a region associated with myth and fantasy; in popular culture especially, the region is consistently tied to skewed notions of the antebellum South that include images of large plantation homes, women in hoop skirts, and magnolia trees that manifest in television and film representations such as Gone With the Wind (1939). Juxtaposed with these idealized, mythic images is the hillbilly trope, reinforced by radio shows such as Lum and Abner, and films such as Scatterbrain (1940). Out of this idea comes the southern illiteracy stereotype, which suggests that southerners are collectively unconcerned with education ...


Pursuing The Universal Particular, Sally Baker 2014 Colby College

Pursuing The Universal Particular, Sally Baker

Colby Magazine

Teaching with passion and precision, Cedric Bryant demonstrates that, like politics, all literature is local.


The Shavzin-Carsch Collection Of Historic Jewish Children’S Literature, Andrea Rapp 2014 Isaac M. Wise Temple, Cincinnati, Ohio

The Shavzin-Carsch Collection Of Historic Jewish Children’S Literature, Andrea Rapp

Judaica Librarianship

The Shavzin-Carsch Collection of Cincinnati’s Isaac M. Wise Temple is a special collection devoted to historically significant American Jewish children’s literature. As of this writing, there are over seven hundred volumes in the collection, including early children’s books published by the Jewish Publication Society, titles listed in early juvenile bibliographies of the Jewish Book Annual, and books cited in key retrospective articles on Jewish children’s literature. This paper describes the collection, and relates how it came to be established, its potential uses to researchers, and future issues to be considered in its expansion.


To Be A Man: A Re-Assessment Of Black Masculinity In Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun And Les Blancs, Julie M. Burrell 2014 Cleveland State University

To Be A Man: A Re-Assessment Of Black Masculinity In Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun And Les Blancs, Julie M. Burrell

English Faculty Publications

The first Black woman to pen a Broadway play, Lorraine Hansberry scripted a majority of male protagonists. Critics tend to see Hansberry’s depiction of Black men as either an unfortunate departure from her feminist concerns, or as damaging representations of Black masculinity. In contrast to such views, this essay maps the trajectory of Hansberry’s career-long project of scripting positive visions of Black masculinity, from the politically progressive, while still patriarchal, structures of masculinity in A Raisin in the Sun, to the heterogeneous performances of revolutionary masculinity in Les Blancs. Further, in her role as public intellectual, Hansberry questioned ...


Here, There, And In Between: Travel As Metaphor In Mixed Race Narratives Of The Harlem Renaissance, Colin Enriquez 2014 Graduate English Department

Here, There, And In Between: Travel As Metaphor In Mixed Race Narratives Of The Harlem Renaissance, Colin Enriquez

Doctoral Dissertations

Created to comment on Antebellum and Reconstruction literature, the tragic mulatto concept is habitually applied to eras beyond the 19th century. The tragic mulatto has become an end rather than a means to questioning racist and abolitionist agendas. Rejecting the pathetic and self-destructive traits inscribed by the tragic label, this dissertation uses geographic, cultural, and racial boundary crossing to theorize a rereading of mixed race characters in Harlem Renaissance literature. Focusing on train, automobile, and boat travel, the study analyzes the relationship between the character, transportation, and technology whereby the notion of race is questioned. Furthermore, the dissertation divides ...


Adapting The Language Of Postcolonial Subjectivity: Mimicry And The Subversive Art Of Kent Monkman, Michael Bick 2014 Salem State University

Adapting The Language Of Postcolonial Subjectivity: Mimicry And The Subversive Art Of Kent Monkman, Michael Bick

Graduate Theses

This thesis explores the complex means by which Native American colonial subjectivity is constituted by a hegemonic epistemology that imbricates race, gender, and sexuality through a language of social hierarchy. By way of racial and gender marginalization, the Native American subject has become a means of authenticating the dominant Euroamerican class. 19th century artists of the American frontier, such as George Catlin and Paul Kane, contributed to an aesthetic tradition that perpetuated the silencing of a Native North American voice and upheld the social hierarchy instituted during colonialism. Through a close reading of the queer and racial images in Canadian ...


“The Impossible That Is Going To Happen”: The Denial Of Death In Roth’S Zuckerman Books, Matthew P. Germenis 2014 The University of Southern Mississippi

“The Impossible That Is Going To Happen”: The Denial Of Death In Roth’S Zuckerman Books, Matthew P. Germenis

Honors Theses

Since Philip Roth’s official retirement from fiction writing after the publication of his last novel in 2010, scholars have embarked on a major reassessment of Roth’s oeuvre. This analysis is a reassessment of Roth’s Nathan Zuckerman series, which includes nine novels beginning with The Ghost Writer (1979) and ending in Exit Ghost (2007). While much has been written on The Ghost Writer and its inclusion of a character that is believed to be Anne Frank, scholars have overlooked the beginning of a major theme in Roth’s work. The emphasis is often placed on Roth’s engagement ...


A Transnational Novel In Disguise: The Influence Of Brazil In Nella Larsen's Passing, Grant M. Andersen 2014 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

A Transnational Novel In Disguise: The Influence Of Brazil In Nella Larsen's Passing, Grant M. Andersen

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Back To The Future: Taking A Trip Back In Order To Move Forward In Octavia Butler’S Kindred, Zakary H. LaFaver 2014 East Tennessee State University

Back To The Future: Taking A Trip Back In Order To Move Forward In Octavia Butler’S Kindred, Zakary H. Lafaver

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Slavery is something that cannot be taken lightly. Even Butler says no matter how harsh the slavery in her novel is, it does not compare to how gruesome actual slavery was: “As a matter of fact, one of the things I realized when I was reading the slave narrative…was that I was not going to be able to come anywhere near presenting slavery as it was. I was going to have to do a some-what cleaned-up version of slavery, or no one would be willing to read it” (qtd. in Kenan 497). Octavia Butler knew that if she presented ...


‘My Freedom Is A Privilege Which Nothing Else Can Equal’: The Life And Writings Of Venture Smith And Phillis Wheatley, American Slaves, Donald Holmes II 2014 The University of Southern Mississippi

‘My Freedom Is A Privilege Which Nothing Else Can Equal’: The Life And Writings Of Venture Smith And Phillis Wheatley, American Slaves, Donald Holmes Ii

Honors Theses

Slavery in the United States was an evolving institution that lasted nearly 400 years. To understand the colonial era of slavery within the United States, I examine the life and times of Venture Smith, as documented in his autobiography, A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture, A Native of Africa (1798), and that of Phillis Wheatley using The Collected Works of Phillis Wheatley (1988). Both Smith and Wheatley were African-born slaves brought to America during the eighteenth century. In Smith’s narrative, he concludes by proclaiming “my freedom is a privilege which nothing else can equal” (31). This ...


Detection Methods For Small Analytes: Improvement Of Novel Spr Technology Detection Of Toxins And Toxicants, William B. Ollayos 2014 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Detection Methods For Small Analytes: Improvement Of Novel Spr Technology Detection Of Toxins And Toxicants, William B. Ollayos

Honors Scholar Theses

Humans are exposed to a variety of toxic substances in their day-to-day activities that may have adverse health effects if not properly identified. An integrated dual-mode instrument that combines grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GCSPR) and grating-coupled surface plasmon coupled emissions (GCSPCE) should allow for the efficient detection of toxic analytes in a high-content system using gold-coated superparamagnetic nanobeads. The goal of this study is to validate the binding characteristics of the reagents intrinsic to this innovative assay methodology. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assays were conducted on NNK toxicants and SEB toxins, which were the ...


Here, There, And In Between: Travel As Metaphor In Mixed Race Narratives Of The Harlem Renaissance, Colin Enriquez 2014 Graduate English Department

Here, There, And In Between: Travel As Metaphor In Mixed Race Narratives Of The Harlem Renaissance, Colin Enriquez

Colin Enriquez

Created to comment on Antebellum and Reconstruction literature, the tragic mulatto concept is habitually applied to eras beyond the 19th century. After the turn of the century, the tragic mulatto has become an end rather than a means to questioning racist and abolitionist agendas. Rejecting the pathetic, selfish, and self-destructive traits inscribed by the tragic mulatto label, this dissertation uses geographic, cultural, and racial boundary crossing to theorize a rereading of the mixed race character of Harlem Renaissance literature. Focusing on instances of train, automobile, and boat travel, the study establishes a distinct relationship between the character, transportation, and technology ...


To All Sisters: Defending Lorraine Hansberry's Integral Role In The Black Arts Movement In Juxtaposition With The Works Of Sonia Sanchez & Adrienne Kennedy, Candace L. Baker 2014 Trinity College

To All Sisters: Defending Lorraine Hansberry's Integral Role In The Black Arts Movement In Juxtaposition With The Works Of Sonia Sanchez & Adrienne Kennedy, Candace L. Baker

Senior Theses and Projects

No abstract provided.


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