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Literature in English, North America, Ethnic and Cultural Minority Commons

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An Anthropological Exploration Of Latino Immigrant Identity In Contemporary Migration Literature, Laura Hoppe 2016 University of Minnesota, Morris

An Anthropological Exploration Of Latino Immigrant Identity In Contemporary Migration Literature, Laura Hoppe

Honors Capstone Projects

Immigration remains one of the hottest topics of debate in the United States. As a country constructed by immigrants and home to over one million newly admitted immigrants each year, the immigration phenomenon has contributed extensively to the multiculturalism seen in the United States today. While many immigrant groups have historically lived in marginalization, the 21st century has proven especially difficult for Latino immigrants--those from Spanish and Portuguese-speaking Latin America. As the current largest immigrant group, Latinos have received a lot of backlash and discrimination in the U.S. Many of these immigrants, whether they immigrate to the U.S ...


Black Dreams: Sight And Sound In African American Life Stories, Karintha Lowe 2016 Macalester College

Black Dreams: Sight And Sound In African American Life Stories, Karintha Lowe

English Honors Projects

This project examines the work of Frederick Douglass, Zora Neale Hurston, Ann Petry, and Langston Hughes, in conjunction with the work of literary and psychoanalytic theorists including Mikhail Bakhtin, Jacques Lacan, and Laura Mulvey. Beginning with Benjamin Franklin’s conception of the “American Dream” as emphasizing a linear, progressive understanding of time and space, I argue that Douglass, Hurston, Petry, and Hughes all reshape this narrative of upward mobility to include the experiences of marginalized communities. By analyzing how each author used multiple genres, including autobiography, parody, song, and poetry, to form a single narrative, I contend that these life ...


The Learning Analytics Readiness Instrument, Meghan Oster, Steven Lonn, Matthew D. Pistilli, Michael G. Brown 2016 University of Michagan

The Learning Analytics Readiness Instrument, Meghan Oster, Steven Lonn, Matthew D. Pistilli, Michael G. Brown

Matthew Pistilli

Little is known about the processes institutions use when discerning their readiness to implement learning analytics. This study aims to address this gap in the literature by using survey data from the beta version of the Learning Analytics Readiness Instrument (LARI) [1]. Twenty-four institutions were surveyed and 560 respondents participated. Five distinct factors were identified from a factor analysis of the results: Culture; Data Management Expertise; Data Analysis Expertise; Communication and Policy Application; and, Training. Data were analyzed using both the role of those completing the survey and the Carnegie classification of the institutions as lenses. Generally, information technology professionals ...


Women's Memoirs In The 20th Century, Alexandra Fradelizio 2016 Dominican University of California

Women's Memoirs In The 20th Century, Alexandra Fradelizio

Scholarly & Creative Works Conference 2019

Memoirs have long been a valuable way in which individuals share and reflect on their past experiences. The genre of memoir writing especially had a tremendous impact on a range of American female writers. This thesis explores memoirs written by women throughout the 20th century. With the shift in women’s roles during the 1900s and early 2000s, the memoirs examined emphasize the importance of feminine identity. The analysis provided within this thesis centers on each memoirist’s unique path in determining her sense of self. Moreover, the memoirists each use the process of writing to relay the value ...


Keeping The Memories Alive: Fictionalized Narratives Of Japanese Internment In North America, Erin Anderson 2016 Georgia State University

Keeping The Memories Alive: Fictionalized Narratives Of Japanese Internment In North America, Erin Anderson

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Dreaming Free From The Chains: Teaching The Rhetorical Sovereignty Of Gerald Vizenor Through Bearheart , Lydia R. Presley 2016 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Dreaming Free From The Chains: Teaching The Rhetorical Sovereignty Of Gerald Vizenor Through Bearheart , Lydia R. Presley

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

The purpose of this thesis is to examine Gerald Vizenor’s novel Bearheart, through the lens of rhetorical sovereignty. What this means is that the crux of my understanding of Bearheart begins with the knowledge that the language, terminology, and style used by Vizenor are not only his choices, but also his inherent Native right to use. I argue that it is important to teach Vizenor’s theoretical ideas through Bearheart because each of its relatively short episodes, or series of episodes, deals with a key theoretical idea that can be explored not only in a Native American literature setting ...


Activism, Community And Cultural Heritage: “Communitism” In Creek Literature, Rachel Maria Cain 2016 University of Dayton

Activism, Community And Cultural Heritage: “Communitism” In Creek Literature, Rachel Maria Cain

Honors Theses

"Communitism" refers to literature that encourages activism by celebrating and promoting American Indian communities. This thesis investigates how the literary works, The Fus Fixico Letters (1902 – 1908) and Drowning in Fire (2004), are communitist by supporting specific political and social changes in Creek communities. Through The Fus Fixico Letters Alexander Posey promoted his progressive political convictions, including that Creeks should embrace land allotment and endorse the creation a separate state for American Indians. Drowning in Fire, by Craig Womack, takes place throughout 1904 – 1993 and relates traditional Creek stories and practices to modern life. The novel delves into issues such ...


Poetry And The Post-Apocalyptic Paradox: North American Indigenous Disruptions To The Westernized Self, Joseph Benjamin Ziegler Ferber 2016 University of Dayton

Poetry And The Post-Apocalyptic Paradox: North American Indigenous Disruptions To The Westernized Self, Joseph Benjamin Ziegler Ferber

Honors Theses

This three-chapter project explores the work of three poets, each identifying with different North American indigenous tribes. Their work challenges western poetic conventions and notions of individualism to offer alternative worldviews and complicate mainstream oversimplifications of American Indian identity. Brandi MacDougall investigates assumptions of the Western Self represented by the "I" Perspective common in Western thought; Sherman Alexie revises the sonnet form to portray the complexity of how contemporary American Indians navigate the blending of capitalist institutions and native traditions; Kristi Leora offers readers an enlightened conception of self-hood by balancing processes of western socialization with native cosmology. Ultimately, this ...


“The Thing That Made Her Beautiful And Not Us”: Visible Identity And Postmodern Emotion In Contemporary American Fiction, Madeleine Kim 2016 Trinity College, Hartford Connecticut

“The Thing That Made Her Beautiful And Not Us”: Visible Identity And Postmodern Emotion In Contemporary American Fiction, Madeleine Kim

Senior Theses and Projects

No abstract provided.


Unmooring And Anchoring Bigger Thomas: Ontological Confusion And Mercy In Richard Wright’S Native Son, Davey Cox 2016 Brigham Young University

Unmooring And Anchoring Bigger Thomas: Ontological Confusion And Mercy In Richard Wright’S Native Son, Davey Cox

Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism

Richard Wright's novel, Native Son, puts Bigger Thomas on display as an isolated soul, ontologically separated from the world around him and confused about his place in it. The work of Phillipe Descola aids in understanding the cultural models that lead to this confusion by elucidating the underlying schemas by which people organize their experience. Bigger's isolation appears incurable, or difficult to approach at best. The novel's proposed solution is mercy, or closeness and connection, which both Jan and Max offer Bigger. Much of the novel's content and it's treatment thereof is relevant to the ...


What Did He Just Say? Did She Really Just Say That?: Vignettes Of Racism In Claudia Rankine’S Citizen: An American Lyric, Susan Ayres 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

What Did He Just Say? Did She Really Just Say That?: Vignettes Of Racism In Claudia Rankine’S Citizen: An American Lyric, Susan Ayres

Susan Ayres

No abstract provided.


Claudia Rankine And The Poetry Of Protest, Susan Ayres 2016 Texas A&M University School of Law

Claudia Rankine And The Poetry Of Protest, Susan Ayres

Susan Ayres

No abstract provided.


“The Problem Of Pocahontas”: Colonialism, Stereotypes, And Personal Identity In Janet Campbell Hale’S Bloodlines: Odyssey Of A Native Daughter, Nicole Vance 2016 Thompson Rivers University

“The Problem Of Pocahontas”: Colonialism, Stereotypes, And Personal Identity In Janet Campbell Hale’S Bloodlines: Odyssey Of A Native Daughter, Nicole Vance

Proceedings of the Annual Thompson Rivers University Undergraduate Research and Innovation Conference

As a genre, traditional autobiography has historically been an exclusive domain, most accessible to the male writer. In contrast, the memoir genre has broadened the field of life writing and has granted a voice to members of marginalized groups. As acknowledged by various literary critics, the memoir form, which is less ego-focused, has been especially important to female writers who often express personal identity in relation to their surrounding communities. However, this link between the self and the communal can be damaging, especially in a dominant culture that perpetuates stereotypes about minorities. In this research paper, I analyze the manifestation ...


A Passage From Brooklyn To Ithaca: The Sea, The City And The Body In The Poetics Of Walt Whitman And C. P. Cavafy, Michael P. Skafidas 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

A Passage From Brooklyn To Ithaca: The Sea, The City And The Body In The Poetics Of Walt Whitman And C. P. Cavafy, Michael P. Skafidas

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This treatise is the first extensive comparative study of Walt Whitman and C. P. Cavafy. Despite the abundant scholarship dealing with the work and life of each, until now no critic has put the two poets together. Whitman’s poetry celebrates birth, youth, the self and the world as seen for the first time, while Cavafy’s diverts from the active present to resurrect a world whose key, in Eliot’s terms, is memory. Yet, I see the two poets conversing in the crossroads of the fin de siècle; the American Whitman and the Greek Cavafy embody the antithesis of ...


Ceasing To Run Underground: 20th-Century Women Writers And Hydro-Logical Thought, Annie M. Cranstoun 2016 Graduate Center, City University of New York

Ceasing To Run Underground: 20th-Century Women Writers And Hydro-Logical Thought, Annie M. Cranstoun

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Starting from two central ecopoetic convictions—the constitutive role of environment in human experience (and vice versa), and text’s ability to connect with the world—this dissertation then moves in a different direction from most ecocritical projects. Instead of looking at the ways literary representation flows back into nature in the forms of attitude, praxis, and policy, this study focuses on the earlier part of the loop: the emergence of text from environment, particularly its aquatic parts, via the faculty of the imagination. In its scrutiny of images that spring directly from matter and its faith in the concept ...


The Significance Of John S. Mbiti's Works In The Study Of Pan-African Literature, Babacar Mbaye 2016 Kent State University

The Significance Of John S. Mbiti's Works In The Study Of Pan-African Literature, Babacar Mbaye

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Arts: Fiction And Fiction Writers: The Americas, Rachel Norman 2016 Linfield College

Arts: Fiction And Fiction Writers: The Americas, Rachel Norman

Faculty Publications

This essay by Rachel Norman, which originally appeared in the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures, discusses contemporary Muslim fiction published in the United States with a particular focus on three novels: Mojha Kahf's The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf, Laila Halaby's Once in a Promised Land, and Randa Jarrar's A Map of Home.


Overcoming More Than Physical Borders: The Challenges Gender Creates For Hispanic Immigrants, Guadalupe Esquivel 2016 Nebraska College Preparatory Academy

Overcoming More Than Physical Borders: The Challenges Gender Creates For Hispanic Immigrants, Guadalupe Esquivel

Nebraska College Preparatory Academy Senior Capstone Projects

An analysis of T. Coraghessan Boyle’s The Tortilla Curtain and Sandra Cisneros's “Woman Hollering Creek” shows the measures that Mexican women take to find their identity after immigrating. Facing discrimination on the basis of both race and gender, this task is more difficult for females than for their male counterparts. It is a challenge that continues for many women today as they balance two worlds and are expected to fully carry the roles of both. This is a focus on the main characters of the above texts, Americá Rincón and Cleofilas, respectively, as well as personal essays written ...


Female Agency In Religious Disassembly Of Culture: Where Do Women Fit In?, Megan Elizabeth Kirby 2016 Eastern Kentucky University

Female Agency In Religious Disassembly Of Culture: Where Do Women Fit In?, Megan Elizabeth Kirby

Online Theses and Dissertations

A study of The Color Purple and Possessing the Secret of Joy as they relate to cultural disassembly and the relationship to missionaries from Western cultures. Some focus is placed on Alice Walker's views on female genital mutilation and how that was impacted by Christian viewpoints. Theoretical perspectives from Homi Bhabha and Chandra Mohanty emphasize the role of so-called "third world women" in world politics and feminism.


Loving The Unlovable Body In Lois Ann Yamanaka’S Saturday Night At The Pahala Theatre, Christa Baiada 2016 CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College

Loving The Unlovable Body In Lois Ann Yamanaka’S Saturday Night At The Pahala Theatre, Christa Baiada

Publications and Research

Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s award-winning yet remarkably neglected Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre (1993) explores female adolescence and coming of age in a rich, polyphonic collection of verse novellas. “Loving the Unlovable Body” focuses on Yamanaka’s treatment of this transition as a fully embodied, fraught, and often painful experience by explicating the uses of several tropes used to express girls’ experiences of their bodies: eating, voice, eyes, fragmentation, and marking/naming. These metaphors contribute to the development of a complex range of possibilities from devastating to hopeful, presented in juxtaposition and interplay, for girls’ relationships to their culturally denigrated ...


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