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4,260 full-text articles. Page 127 of 129.

Mrs. Meyrick's Cat, Derek Miller 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Mrs. Meyrick's Cat, Derek Miller

The George Eliot Review

'''Great God!" the words escaped Deronda' as he watched the just-prevented-from-drowning Mirah. 'The old thought had come now with a new impetus of mingled feeling, and urged that exclamation in which both East and West have for ages concentrated their awe in the presence of inexorable calamity.'!

Among those who welcome Mirah to Mrs. Meyrick's household is the cat Hafiz, seen by Deronda as it 'came forward with tail erect and rubbed himself against her ankles', an Eastern moment accompanying Mirah's entrance into the Meyrick family. Hafiz is later to purr as Mirah starts to tell her story ...


Expressive Things In Adam Bede, Barabar Hardy 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Expressive Things In Adam Bede, Barabar Hardy

The George Eliot Review

A drop of ink is the first thing in the first sentence of George Eliot's first novel: 'With a single drop of ink for a mirror, the Egyptian sorcerer undertakes to reveal to any chance corner farreaching visions of the past.' Like many objects in Adam Bede, this one is more complicated than first appears. In its generalized imaging of magical creation, ritual and prophesy, it is an invocation, introducing and solemnizing the other object with which it is twinned and compared, the real drop of ink at the end of the author's pen which has actually written ...


George Eliot As Historian: The Case Of Mr. Crewe And Hugh Hughes, David Paterson 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

George Eliot As Historian: The Case Of Mr. Crewe And Hugh Hughes, David Paterson

The George Eliot Review

Historians look for as many different sources of evidence as they can to describe and interpret the past. How far is fiction a valid source? Great fiction may reveal great truths but is this only in a general sense? George Eliot herself seems to suggest above that reliance on 'descriptions of novelists' may be a perilous route to an accurate portrait: but what about relying on descriptions of those in her own books? Despite one specific denial, some of her 'portraits of clergymen' contain valuable historical elements.

An examination of one part of Scenes of Clerical Life shows George Eliot ...


Notes On Middlemarch And Romola, Rodney Stenning Edgecombe 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Notes On Middlemarch And Romola, Rodney Stenning Edgecombe

The George Eliot Review

Rereading Middlemarch and Romola recently, 1 was struck by some unrecorded musical and literary parallels, none of them substantial enough (or indeed sufficiently interconnected) to be woven into an integrated article, but having, 1 hope, enough intrinsic interest to warrant my presenting them here as so many Casaubonic 'leavings' that might or might not be incorporated into future work on the author.

A Schubertian Moment in Middlemarch

George Eliot's enthusiasm for the Lieder of Schubert is attested by a letter written in October, 1859 - 'Schubert's songs, 1 especially delight in' (Letters, Ill: 178) - and our knowledge of that ...


Adam Bede And Emigration, Josephine McDonagh 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Adam Bede And Emigration, Josephine Mcdonagh

The George Eliot Review

Although emigration to settler colonies was a widespread phenomenon in mid nineteenth century Britain, it is a theme to which George Eliot appears to give very little attention. Of all the works, Adam Bede is the novel which seems especially home-bound. Characters who go abroad do so in penitence: Hetty is transported to Australia, where she dies; and Arthur goes to the East to make up for having committed 'the sort of wrong that can never be made up for' ('Epilogue'). In so far as it is discussed in the novel, migration is the chimera of the mistaken Mr. Gedge ...


Editor's Note - 2010, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Editor's Note - 2010

The George Eliot Review

1. The articles in this issue by Dinah Birch, Rachel Bowlby, Barbara Hardy, and Josephine McDonagh were originally delivered as papers at the Adam Bede conference held at the Institute of English Studies, University of London, on 7 November 2009.


Annual Report 2009, John Burton 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Annual Report 2009, John Burton

The George Eliot Review

I am pleased to report that last year was a successful one. There are things we might have done better, or differently, but I think we can say that 2009 was marked by events which provided huge pleasure and satisfaction for our members, and for a much wider audience beyond our membership.

The AGM last year heard a request from Liz Mellor for some sabbatical time whilst she dealt with health problems and members agreed to that request. We then held a discussion about the Fellowship and what we hoped to see develop in the future. Members enjoyed the chance ...


Review Of Charles Dickens, Michael Slater 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Review Of Charles Dickens, Michael Slater

The George Eliot Review

On the first page of this splendid new biography, Dickens is cited referring to his own earliest writings as 'certain tragedies achieved at the mature age of eight or ten and represented with great applause to overflowing nurseries'. The genially tongue-in-cheek celebration of his own precociousness is entirely characteristic, with the final flourish of 'overflowing nurseries' an example of the kind of 'unnecessary detail' that Orwell identified as a typical device of Dickensian comedy. 'Overflowing' both transforms the brief recollection into a comic scene and indicates the essential quality of the creative imagination at work here. A very different writer ...


Review Of Daniel Deronda, 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Review Of Daniel Deronda

The George Eliot Review

A dramatized version of Daniel Deranda scripted by John Cooper was produced by the Traffic of the Stage Company at the Upstairs at the Gatehouse Theatre in Highgate in May. Directed by Harry Meacher, it had a cast of seventeen actors who between them played forty-one different parts. The audience sat on three sides of the acting area (the floor of which was patterned like a giant roulette wheel) and the actors, when not directly engaged in the action, moved to the edges of this space where they would, when appropriate (i.e., when the scene was a party or ...


Rationale For Magneto: Testament, Brian Kelley 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Rationale For Magneto: Testament, Brian Kelley

SANE journal: Sequential Art Narrative in Education

A rationale for teaching the graphic novel Magneto:Testament in secondary schools.


Review Of Teaching Graphic Novels, By Katie Monnin, Susan Spangler 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Review Of Teaching Graphic Novels, By Katie Monnin, Susan Spangler

SANE journal: Sequential Art Narrative in Education

No abstract provided.


On Teaching The Story Of O: Lateral Ethics And The Conditions Of Reading, Peter J. Rabinowitz 2010 Hamilton College

On Teaching The Story Of O: Lateral Ethics And The Conditions Of Reading, Peter J. Rabinowitz

Articles

No abstract provided.


“Globalized Philomels: State Patriarchy, Transnational Capital, And The Femicides On The Us-Mexican Border In Roberto Bolaño’S 2666”, M Laura Barberan Reinares 2010 CUNY Bronx Community College

“Globalized Philomels: State Patriarchy, Transnational Capital, And The Femicides On The Us-Mexican Border In Roberto Bolaño’S 2666”, M Laura Barberan Reinares

Publications and Research

No abstract provided.


Dueling, Honor And Sensibility In Eighteenth-Century Spanish Sentimental Comedies, Kristie Bulleit Niemeier 2010 University of Kentucky

Dueling, Honor And Sensibility In Eighteenth-Century Spanish Sentimental Comedies, Kristie Bulleit Niemeier

University of Kentucky Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation explores the representation of dueling and honor in five theatrical works in order to answer one central question: How does the Golden Age concept of honor transform in the age of Enlightenment? This question may be broken down into specific inquiries, such as: 1) How is honor filtered through sentiment? 2) How did eighteenth-century ilustrados use theater to attempt to resolve the conflict between using violence to defend one’s honor and the Enlightenment ideal of avoiding excess? and 3) How did honor affect the private citizen and his relationship to the state in plays?

During the eighteenth ...


Rationale For Pride Of Baghdad, Crag Hill Ph.D. 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Rationale For Pride Of Baghdad, Crag Hill Ph.D.

SANE journal: Sequential Art Narrative in Education

A rationale for teaching the graphic novel Pride of Baghdad at the secondary level.


Comic Vision, Gale Acuff 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Comic Vision, Gale Acuff

SANE journal: Sequential Art Narrative in Education

A narrative, rhetorical poem


Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, And Comics, Brian Kelley 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, And Comics, Brian Kelley

SANE journal: Sequential Art Narrative in Education

The first global distribution of a paper prepared for the Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Graphic Novels Special Interest Group of the International Reading Association,the Executive Board of the New Jersey Reading Association, and the Legislative and Professional Standards Committee of the NJRA.


Women With Short Hair, Amanda Layne Stephens 2010 Marshall University

Women With Short Hair, Amanda Layne Stephens

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Women with Short Hair is a short-fiction collection that centers on the lives of four women who live in West Virginia. Each story depicts a female character during a different developmental stage: childhood in ―In Casino Daycare,‖ young adulthood in ―Felis domestica,‖ adulthood in ―Date Night at the Beach,‖ and middle-age in ―Women with Short Hair.‖ Short-fiction collections that influenced Women with Short Hair include Flannery O‘Connor‘s A Good Man Is Hard to Find, James Joyce‘s Dubliners, and Ernest Hemingway‘s In Our Time. Symbolism, repetition, the objective correlative, and free indirect discourse constitute reoccurring literary devices ...


Heavier Than It Looks And Other Stories, Matthew Tobias Ray 2010 Marshall University

Heavier Than It Looks And Other Stories, Matthew Tobias Ray

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Heavier Than It Looks and Other Stories is a collection of fiction containing one novella-length story, in six parts, centering on the life of a young man coming to terms with a close friend’s suicide. The remaining stories depict different characters amidst situations unique to each character’s stage in life: childhood in 1930s Appalachia in "The Other Kid In a Candy Store," mourning and violent crime in "Picking A Lock," transcendence in "Pathétique," mid-life changes in "Lester’s Last Melancholy," managing addiction in "Staying Clean," youthful folly in "Just For Fun," and storytelling in "The Taste of a ...


The Postcolonial "Knight‘S Tale": A Social Commentary On Post-Norman Invasion England, Ruth M.E. Oldman 2010 Marshall University

The Postcolonial "Knight‘S Tale": A Social Commentary On Post-Norman Invasion England, Ruth M.E. Oldman

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Every author injects a purpose into his or her works; in Chaucer‘s case, he scribed The Canterbury Tales, which tackles and successfully demonstrates various aspects to fourteenth century English society and culture. "The Knight‘s Tale" is no different; the tale is almost identical, plot-wise, to Giovanni Boccaccio‘s Teseida, and yet Chaucer weaves a tale that is distinctive. The tale reflects Chaucer‘s views on his society, in particular post-Norman attitudes. By examining the text with a post-colonial theoretical approach, Chaucer‘s "The Knight‘s Tale" is a subaltern commentary on the colonization of England after the Norman ...


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