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Elizabeth I And The ‘Sovereign Arts’: Essays In Literature, History, And Culture, Donald Stump, Linda Shenk, Carole Levin 2011 Saint Louis University

Elizabeth I And The ‘Sovereign Arts’: Essays In Literature, History, And Culture, Donald Stump, Linda Shenk, Carole Levin

English Books

Elizabeth I and the ‘Sovereign Arts’ brings together eighteen wide-ranging and accessible essays on the queen and her extraordinary methods as a ruler. Focusing less on the usual sites of government than on more peripheral places where Elizabeth presented herself to her people and the world, the volume takes up early interactions with her family, popular representations of her as a mother, her use of poetry and oratory to persuade, her aims in elevating favorite men, and her constant interplay with her people through travels, tournaments, portraits, and literary works depicting her as a wise and divinely ordained ruler.


All Country Roads Lead To Rome: Idealization Of The Countryside In Augustan Poetry And American Country Music, Alice Lyons 2011 Claremont McKenna College

All Country Roads Lead To Rome: Idealization Of The Countryside In Augustan Poetry And American Country Music, Alice Lyons

CMC Senior Theses

This paper examines similarities between imagery of the countryside and the “country life” in both the poetry of Augustan Rome and contemporary American country music. It analyzes the themes of agriculture, poverty, family, and piety, and how they are used in both sets of sources to create an idealized countryside. This ideal, when contrasted with negative portrayals of urban life and non-idealized rural life, endorses an ideology that is opposed to wealth and that emphasizes the security and stability of the idyllic countryside. This ideology common to both may stem from the historical contexts of these two eras, revealing that ...


Myth Materialized: Thirteenth Century Additions To The West Façade Of San Marco And Their Value In Venetian History Making, Michelle Reynolds 2011 University of Puget Sound

Myth Materialized: Thirteenth Century Additions To The West Façade Of San Marco And Their Value In Venetian History Making, Michelle Reynolds

Summer Research

The focus of this paper is on the basilica of San Marco in Venice and its relationship to the political and social culture in which it was erected. Looking directly at the set of four horses placed high above the five main entrances and the mosaics of the transfer of Saint Mark’s relics to Venice which originally decorated these portals in the thirteenth century, this paper looks to discover connections between these rather unique designs and stylistic choices and the unique sense of identity the Venetians had long perpetuated. The two different groups of works illuminate deliberate stylistic connections ...


Christopher Stray (Ed.), Classical Dictionaries: Past, Present And Future - Book Review, Tom Keeline 2011 Western Washington University

Christopher Stray (Ed.), Classical Dictionaries: Past, Present And Future - Book Review, Tom Keeline

Modern & Classical Languages

When once pressed at a party about what he really did for a living, D.R. Shackleton Bailey is said to have acerbically replied, “I just look things up all day.” This remark, however ironic, carries more than a grain of truth: classicists do in fact devote vast portions of their lives to looking things up, especially in dictionaries of Greek and Latin. It is thus salutary to reflect on the nature of the tools we all spend so much time using. Classical Dictionaries, an edited collection of papers delivered at an Oxford conference in June 2009, does just that ...


The Identity Of Late Barbarians: Goths And Wine, Walter Stevenson 2011 University of Richmond

The Identity Of Late Barbarians: Goths And Wine, Walter Stevenson

Classical Studies Faculty Publications

Wine, symbol of civilization in the Mediterranean for millennia and still a profound cultural marker in Europe today, is not often associated with the Goths.1 But there is evidence allowing us to add this Northern European barbarian people to the tapestry of ancient wine production2 at the same time that they were beginning to cultivate the first European barbarian literature with the translation of the Bible into the Gothic language.


Hiatus Avoidance And Metrification In The Rigveda, Dieter C. Gunkel, Kevin Ryan 2011 University of Richmond

Hiatus Avoidance And Metrification In The Rigveda, Dieter C. Gunkel, Kevin Ryan

Classical Studies Faculty Publications

Using new corpus resources for Rigvedic poetics, we address various aspects of the poets' treatment of vowel hiatus and pre-vocalic shortening (correption), including their strategies for avoidance of these phenomena in certain contexts. Using observed vs. expected tests, we demonstrate, for one, that hiatus avoidance is correlated with degree of metrical-prosodic juncture. For example, hiatus is actively avoided both at the caesura in trimeter verse and between padãs, but its avoidance is weaker in the latter case. In conducting these tests, we control for a confound (interference) from pre-vocalic shortening, which requires us to address the problem of whether it ...


Review- Startling Strangeness: Reading Lonergan's., Randall Rosenberg 2011 Seton Hall University

Review- Startling Strangeness: Reading Lonergan's., Randall Rosenberg

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


Ignatius, Lonergan, And The Catholic University, Richard Liddy 2011 Seton Hall University

Ignatius, Lonergan, And The Catholic University, Richard Liddy

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


Review- Startling Strangeness: Reading Lonergan's Insight. By Richard M. Liddy., Michael McGuckian 2011 Seton Hall University

Review- Startling Strangeness: Reading Lonergan's Insight. By Richard M. Liddy., Michael Mcguckian

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


Method In Catholic Studies, Richard Liddy 2011 Seton Hall University

Method In Catholic Studies, Richard Liddy

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


Catholicity And Faculty Seminars, Richard Liddy 2011 Seton Hall University

Catholicity And Faculty Seminars, Richard Liddy

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


Changing Our Minds: Bernard Lonergan And Climate Change, Richard Liddy 2011 Seton Hall University

Changing Our Minds: Bernard Lonergan And Climate Change, Richard Liddy

Department of Religion Publications

No abstract provided.


The Old And The Restless: The Egyptians And The Scythians In Herodotus' Histories, Robert J. Hagan 2011 Bard College

The Old And The Restless: The Egyptians And The Scythians In Herodotus' Histories, Robert J. Hagan

Senior Projects Spring 2011

The first part of this project focuses on the differences and similarities between the Egyptians and Scythians that occur in Herodotus' work. The second part will examine how this contrast helps the reader understand the many other cultures discussed in the book, focusing on the Persians in particular, and what these similarities and differences mean to Herodotus in terms of the Histories as a whole.


Review Of Naming The Witch: Magic, Ideology, And Stereotype In The Ancient World, By Kimberly B. Stratton, Radcliffe G. Edmonds III 2011 Bryn Mawr College

Review Of Naming The Witch: Magic, Ideology, And Stereotype In The Ancient World, By Kimberly B. Stratton, Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii

Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Classics For Cool Kids: Popular And Unpopular Versions Of Antiquity For Children, Sheila Murnaghan 2011 University of Pennsylvania

Classics For Cool Kids: Popular And Unpopular Versions Of Antiquity For Children, Sheila Murnaghan

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Since Nathaniel Hawthorne's pioneering A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls (1851) and Tanglewood Tales (1853), retelling Greek and Roman myths for children has been a widespread and influential means of popularizing classical material. While Hawthorne unabashedly appropriated the myths as entertainment for young readers, works by his contemporary counterparts (such as the "Myth-O-Mania" series,Greece! Rome! Monsters! , and the Percy Jackson series) display a more anxious and conflicted approach to the same material, caught between the aims of educating their readers about antiquity and appealing to their readers' presumed hostility to school and learning.


Christian Worship, Kimberly Bowes 2011 University of Pennsylvania

Christian Worship, Kimberly Bowes

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

When in 313 the emperor Constantine declared his support for the Christian religion, he was taking a risk. An earlier generation of church scholars had supposed that in the three hundred years since the death of Christ, his followers had manage to expand to the point that Constantine's declaration of support was simply a recognition of the inevitable--Christian triumph by sheer force of numbers. Recent work suggests a more complex reality. Christianity was very slow to get going: by about 200, perhaps as many as 200000 Christians existed on the earth. Even by maximum estimates of expansion, Christian populations ...


Reimagining Ancient Italy: New Directions In Italian Archaeology, Kimberly Bowes 2011 University of Pennsylvania

Reimagining Ancient Italy: New Directions In Italian Archaeology, Kimberly Bowes

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

In the modern imagination, Italy is a land of rolling vineyards, dramatic coastal vistas, and of course, extraordinary food— infinite varieties of pasta, delicate pastries, rich cheeses, and earthy wines. Italian archaeology does not perhaps conjure up quite such an image of richness and diversity. The great monuments of Rome—the Colosseum, the Pantheon, the Roman Forum, and the catacombs—have dominated foreigners’ experience of Italian archaeology since the era of the Grand Tour. The practice of archaeology was, until the 1960s, similarly limited: the search for Greco-Roman antiquities— sculpture, vases, temples, and rich houses—preoccupied Italian and foreign archaeologists ...


Festivals In The Afterlife: A New Reading Of The Petelia Tablet (Of 476.11), Radcliffe G. Edmonds III 2011 Bryn Mawr College

Festivals In The Afterlife: A New Reading Of The Petelia Tablet (Of 476.11), Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii

Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Excavation Of Archaic Houses At Azoria In 2005-2006, Donald C. Haggis, Margaret S. Mook, Rodney D. Fitzsimons, C. Margaret Scarry, Lynn M. Snyder 2011 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Excavation Of Archaic Houses At Azoria In 2005-2006, Donald C. Haggis, Margaret S. Mook, Rodney D. Fitzsimons, C. Margaret Scarry, Lynn M. Snyder

World Languages and Cultures Publications

This article reports on the excavation of Archaic houses (6th–early 5th century b.c.) in 2005 and 2006 at Azoria in eastern Crete. Five houses are discussed: four on the South Acropolis on the periphery of the civic center, and one on the North Acropolis. Well-preserved floor deposits provide evidence for room functions and permit a preliminary analysis of domestic space. The houses fill a lacuna in the published record of the 6th and early 5th centuries b.c. and contribute to our understanding of the form of Archaic houses in the Aegean and the integration of domestic space ...


Excavations In The Archaic Civic Buildings At Azoria In 2005-2006, Donald C. Haggis, Margaret S. Mook, Rodney D. Fitzsimons, C. Margaret Scarry, Lynn M. Snyder, William C. West III 2011 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Excavations In The Archaic Civic Buildings At Azoria In 2005-2006, Donald C. Haggis, Margaret S. Mook, Rodney D. Fitzsimons, C. Margaret Scarry, Lynn M. Snyder, William C. West Iii

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Continuing excavation on the South Acropolis at Azoria in northeastern Crete has exposed buildings of Archaic date (7th–early 5th century b.c.) that served communal or public functions. Work conducted in 2005 and 2006 completed the exploration of Late Archaic levels within the Communal Dining Building (putative andreion complex), the Monumental Civic Building, and the adjacent Service Building. These contexts and their assemblages, especially the animal and plant remains, permit the characterization of diverse dining practices and the interpretation of patterns of food production and consumption. Both the Communal Dining Building and the Monumental Civic Building show extensive evidence ...


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