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A Philology Of Liberation: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As A Reader Of The Classics, Thomas E. Strunk 2010 Xavier University - Cincinnati

A Philology Of Liberation: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As A Reader Of The Classics, Thomas E. Strunk

Faculty Scholarship

This paper explores the intellectual relationship between Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the classics, particularly the works of Plato, Sophocles, and Aeschylus. Recognizing Dr. King as a reader of the classics is significant for two reasons: the classics played a formative role in Dr. King's development into a political activist and an intellectual of the first order; moreover, Dr. King shows us the way to read the classics. Dr. King did not read the classics in a pedantic or even academic manner, but for the purpose of liberation. Dr. King's legacy, thus, is not merely his political ...


Saving The Life Of A Foolish Poet: Tacitus On Marcus Lepidus, Thrasea Paetus, And Political Action Under The Principate, Thomas E. Strunk 2010 Xavier University - Cincinnati

Saving The Life Of A Foolish Poet: Tacitus On Marcus Lepidus, Thrasea Paetus, And Political Action Under The Principate, Thomas E. Strunk

Faculty Scholarship

This paper explores Tacitus' representation of Thrasea Paetus. Preliminary to analyzing this portrayal, I discuss two passages often cited when exploring Tacitus' political thought, Agricola 42.4 and Annales 4.20. I reject the former's validity with regard to Thrasea and accept the latter as a starting point for comparing Tacitus' depictions of Marcus Lepidus and Thrasea. Tacitus' characterizations of Thrasea and Lepidus share the greatest resemblance in the trials of Antistius Sosianus and Clutorius Priscus, both of whom wrote verses offensive to the regime. Thrasea and Lepidus both came to the defense of their respective poet in an ...


"The Urban Praetor's Tribunal" In Spaces Of Justice In The Roman World, Eric Kondratieff 2010 Western Kentucky University

"The Urban Praetor's Tribunal" In Spaces Of Justice In The Roman World, Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

"Book abstract: Despite the crucial role played by both law and architecture in Roman culture, the Romans never developed a type of building that was specifically and exclusively reserved for the administration of justice: courthouses did not exist in Roman antiquity. The present volume addresses this paradox by investigating the spatial settings of Roman judicial practices from a variety of perspectives. Scholars of law, topography, architecture, political history, and literature concur in putting Roman judicature back into its concrete physical context, exploring how the exercise of law interacted with the environment in which it took place, and how the spaces ...


Intestinum Scelus: Preemptive Execution In Tacitus' Annals, Cynthia Damon 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Intestinum Scelus: Preemptive Execution In Tacitus' Annals, Cynthia Damon

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

This chapter examines Tacitus' representation of the legacy of civil war in his history of the Julio‐Claudian period, the Annals, arguing that civil war persists during the pax Augusta as a kind of banalization of state violence against citizens, a political system that consumes its own. It studies Tacitus' multi‐episode account of Nero's paranoid, possibly cynical, and ultimately self‐defeating appropriation of civil war exempla to motivate the suppression of potential dissent.


Literary Criticism, Joseph Farrell 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Literary Criticism, Joseph Farrell

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Most of the literary theorists and critics of classical antiquity who are still studied today – Plato, Aristotle, ‘Longinus’, and a few others – are Greeks. The Romans, who by reputation came late to literature and lacked a theoretical cast of mind, are not generally accorded a prominent place in the development of this discourse. Indeed, few surviving Roman texts address as their main topic the business of literary criticism, at least as that phrase is understood today. Nevertheless, the critical discussion of literature was a popular social activity among the Roman elite and an obligation of the intelligentsia. Horace's Ars ...


The Six Books Of Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: Antecedents And Influence, Joseph Farrell 2010 University of Pennsylvania

The Six Books Of Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura: Antecedents And Influence, Joseph Farrell

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Lucretius’ De rerum natura is one of the relatively few corpora of Greek and Roman literature that is structured in six books. It is distinguished as well by features that encourage readers to understand it both as a sequence of two groups of three books (1+2+3, 4+5+6) and also as three successive pairs of books (1+2, 3+4, 5+6). This paper argues that the former organizations scheme derives from the structure of Ennius’ Annales and the latter from Callimachus’ book of Hynms. It further argues that this Lucretius’ union of these two six-element schemes ...


Sophocles (496–406 Bce), Sheila Murnaghan 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Sophocles (496–406 Bce), Sheila Murnaghan

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

Sophocles’ plays stand out for their portraits of isolation. They showcase characters cut off from others by their difficult personalities and by the circumstances of disease, disgrace, criminality, defiance of authority, exile, bereavement, and early death. Yet from what we can tell, these conditions were quite unlike Sophocles’ own experience. Though the ancient biographies of poets are late and often unreliable, our evidence supports the summary given by Sophocles’ biographer of an enviable life: “he was illustrious both in life and in poetry, he was well educated and raised in comfortable circumstances, and he was chosen for political offices and ...


Allegory And Ascent In Neoplatonism, Peter T. Struck 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Allegory And Ascent In Neoplatonism, Peter T. Struck

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

In Late Antiquity a series of ideas emerges that adds a kind of buoyancy to allegorism. Readers' impulses toward other regions of knowledge begin to flow more consistently upward, drawn by various metaphysical currents that guide and support them. A whole manner of Platonist-inspired architectures structure the cosmos in the early centuries of the Common Era, among thinkers as diverse as the well-known Origen and the mysterious Numenius. Plato's understanding of appearances had always insisted on some higher, unfallen level of reality, in which the forms dwell, and to which we have no access through our senses. This other ...


Remarks On David Daube’S Lectures On Sale, With Special Attention To The Liber Homo And Res Extra Commercium, Ernest Metzger 2010 University of Glasgow

Remarks On David Daube’S Lectures On Sale, With Special Attention To The Liber Homo And Res Extra Commercium, Ernest Metzger

Ernest Metzger

This article discusses a collection of lecture notes on the Roman law of sale prepared by David Daube for an advanced course conducted at the University of Aberdeen from 1954 to 1955. The article considers in detail Daube’s lecture on the sale of the liber homo and res extra commercium in Roman law. An excerpt from that lecture is attached as an Appendix. His treatment of the subject is unfinished (and unpublished), though it is possible to see how his views might have developed. The final section offers an opinion on Daube’s approach to interpreting texts and its ...


Civil Procedure In Classical Rome: Having An Audience With The Magistrate, Ernest Metzger 2010 University of Glasgow

Civil Procedure In Classical Rome: Having An Audience With The Magistrate, Ernest Metzger

Ernest Metzger

During the classical period of Roman law, civil lawsuits were divided into two proceedings: a brief proceeding before the magistrate, who decided certain preliminary matters, and a longer proceeding before a judge, who tried the case. The first proceeding is said to take place “in iure,” which roughly means “in the magistrate’s court.” Unfortunately the figure “in court” has been understood too strictly to refer to the whole of the first phase, and this has given rise to the misunderstanding that the whole of the first phase took place in the magistrate’s presence. The better view is that ...


P.Got. 9: The Subscription, James G. Keenan 2010 Loyola University Chicago

P.Got. 9: The Subscription, James G. Keenan

Classical Studies: Faculty Publications and Other Works

No abstract provided.


Roman Law And The Legal World Of The Romans, James G. Keenan 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Roman Law And The Legal World Of The Romans, James G. Keenan

Classical Studies: Faculty Publications and Other Works

A review of Andrew. M Riggsby's book, Roman Law and the Legal World of the Romans.


Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd 2010 Chapman University

Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd

Art Faculty Articles and Research

This article focuses on the artistic relationship between Baciccio and Gian Lorenzo Bernini.


John Chrysostom, Maruthas And Christian Evangelism In Sasanian Iran, Walter Stevenson 2010 University of Richmond

John Chrysostom, Maruthas And Christian Evangelism In Sasanian Iran, Walter Stevenson

Classical Studies Faculty Publications

Neither John Chrysostom’s efforts to evangelize in Sasanid Persia nor the conflict fought between Rome and Persia in 421 have drawn a great deal of attention.1 So this paper will attempt to navigate the 20 years from John’s initial efforts up to the outbreak of the war without much modern support. Beginning from a series of clues in ancient sources I will try to gather apparently unrelated narratives into a story of how John inadvertently contributed to the even that Kenneth Holum called ‘Pulcheria’s Crusade’. Not that this war earned any of the historical significance of ...


The Nature Of Command In The Macedonian Sarissa Phalanx, Graham Wrightson 2010 South Dakota State University

The Nature Of Command In The Macedonian Sarissa Phalanx, Graham Wrightson

History, Political Science, Philosophy, and Religion Faculty Publications

In his essay, ―Hellenistic military leadership,‖ P. Beston reviews the successes of Hellenistic kings and generals who commanded their armies from the front, inspiring by example.1 In all but one of his examples the individual in question commanded a cavalry squadron. This is hardly surprising. Horses by nature follow each other and so to direct an attack to where it is required the commander would be better served by leading from the front. The relative lack of structure in a cavalry squadron compared with an infantry battalion requires that the commander fight in the front rank. The speed of ...


Classics Newsletter 2010, Department of Classics 2010 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Classics Newsletter 2010, Department Of Classics

The Department of Classics Newsletter

No abstract provided.


In Praise Of The Saints: Introducing Medieval Hagiography Into The British Literature Survey, John P. Sexton 2010 Bridgewater State University

In Praise Of The Saints: Introducing Medieval Hagiography Into The British Literature Survey, John P. Sexton

English Faculty Publications

Despite increased interest in hagiographic writing among scholars of early literature in the last few decades, serious study of saints’ lives in the undergraduate classroom remains rare. To some degree, this is a result of poor representation in the leading anthologies,[1]but another contributing factor has been the perception of a distinction between hagiographic and other medieval writing it terms of genre or of literary value. Such distinctions, however, are modern inventions, and do not accurately reflect the medieval reader or writer’s view. Nor is the inclusion of the literature alongside the expected “great works” difficult or jarring ...


The Bright Cypress Of The 'Orphic' Gold Tablets: Direction And Illumination In Myths Of The Underworld, Radcliffe G. Edmonds III 2010 Bryn Mawr College

The Bright Cypress Of The 'Orphic' Gold Tablets: Direction And Illumination In Myths Of The Underworld, Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii

Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Blaming The Witch: Some Reflections Upon Unexpected Death, Radcliffe G. Edmonds III 2010 Bryn Mawr College

Blaming The Witch: Some Reflections Upon Unexpected Death, Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii

Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Children Of Earth And Starry Heaven: The Meaning And Function Of The Formula In The 'Orphic' Gold Tablets, Radcliffe G. Edmonds III 2010 Bryn Mawr College

The Children Of Earth And Starry Heaven: The Meaning And Function Of The Formula In The 'Orphic' Gold Tablets, Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii

Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


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