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A Long History Of Faith-Based Welfare In Australia: Origins And Impact [Accepted Manuscript], Shurlee Swain 2016 Australian Catholic University

A Long History Of Faith-Based Welfare In Australia: Origins And Impact [Accepted Manuscript], Shurlee Swain

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

In a nation where governments and churches have collaborated in the delivery of welfare services since 1788, such faith-based welfare was seen as normative rather than problematic. Indeed most Australians would struggle to imagine a welfare system that was not built on such an arrangement. However, by the late twentieth century, the world views and ideologies of church leaders and politicians were no longer in alignment, creating tensions in the relationship. This article explores the origins and development of church–state collaboration in the delivery of welfare, and examines the impact this has had on both the shape of charity ...


Fire Was In The Reptile’S Mouth: Towards A Transcultural Ecological Poetics, Stuart Cooke 2016 Griffith University

Fire Was In The Reptile’S Mouth: Towards A Transcultural Ecological Poetics, Stuart Cooke

Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language

This paper compares two creation narratives from indigenous peoples on either side of the Pacific Ocean, the relationships between which catalyse the theorisation of a transcultural approach to ecological poetics. The comparison of these narratives reveals important, rhizomatic similarities, and also unmistakable regional differences, concerning the origins of language and culture in Yanomami (Venezuela) and MakMak (Australia) communities. Concomitant with the centrality of indigenous thought in this theorisation of ecopoetics is the de­centrality of human-only conceptions of poetics. Accordingly, the paper considers non-semantic forms of poetics such as birdsong in order to de-centre classically Western, humanist conceptions of language ...


Anti-Aestheticizing Australian Landscape: Compounding Historical Narratives Within Pictures., Brent Greene 2016 University of Melbourne

Anti-Aestheticizing Australian Landscape: Compounding Historical Narratives Within Pictures., Brent Greene

Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language

The following creative works aspire to construct landscapes that carry multiple, rather than singular, narratives as a means to explore Australia’s extensive landscape tradition. With the benefit of hindsight, the appropriated imagery of Glover and Heysen combine hybrid frameworks of Australian landscape at the time of colonisation and federation; through these pictures neither the colonial or Indigenous narrative is given precedent, alternatively numerous stories are overlayed as a method to communicate past and present entanglements within Australian space.


Conversations With Gunanurang, Lawrence Smith 2016 WA Museum

Conversations With Gunanurang, Lawrence Smith

Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language

Gunanurang (the Ord River) nurtured some of the original Australians productively for millennia. In less than 150 years, their relationship with the river valley and surrounding land was almost destroyed by the effects of the east Kimberley cattle industry commenced in the 1880s. The biological and archaeological surveys before and during the filling of the Lake Argyle dam were a belated attempt to understand what was being lost in the way of ecosystems and aboriginal sites. This short essay encapsulates the impact of the pastoral industry in the Ord valley.


Library Support For Indigenous University Students: Moving From The Periphery To The Mainstream, Joanna Hare, Wendy Abbott 2016 Bond University

Library Support For Indigenous University Students: Moving From The Periphery To The Mainstream, Joanna Hare, Wendy Abbott

Wendy Abbott

Objective This research project explored the models of Indigenous support programs in Australian academic libraries, and how they align with the needs of the students they support. The research objective was to gather feedback from Indigenous students and obtain evidence of good practice models from Australian academic libraries to inform the development and enhancement of Indigenous support programs. The research presents the viewpoints of both Indigenous students and librarians. Methods The research methods comprised an online survey using SurveyMonkey and a focus group. The survey was conducted nationally in Australia to gather evidence on the different models of Indigenous support ...


Religion, The Supernatural And Visual Culture In Early Modern Europe: An Album Amicorum For Charles Zika, Michael D. Bailey 2016 Iowa State University

Religion, The Supernatural And Visual Culture In Early Modern Europe: An Album Amicorum For Charles Zika, Michael D. Bailey

History Publications

This volume developed from a 2009 conference held in honor of Charles Zika at the University of Melbourne, where he spent most of his long career. In addition to an introductory essay by the editors, which provides a brief intellectual biography of Zika and establishes the major themes of the volume, there are seventeen contributions. Befitting Zika’s own interdisciplinarity and pioneering work incorporating visual records into historical analysis, most of the contributors are historians, many of whom draw in some way on art or other visual material, while four are art historians who situate their analysis within particular historical ...


Empathy And Moral Laziness, Kathie Jenni 2016 University of Redlands

Empathy And Moral Laziness, Kathie Jenni

Animal Studies Journal

In The Empathy Exams Leslie Jamison offers an unusual perspective: ‘Empathy isn’t just something that happens to us – a meteor shower of synapses firing across the brain – it’s also a choice we make: to pay attention, to extend ourselves. It’s made of exertion, that dowdier cousin of impulse’ (23). This essay is dedicated to elaborating that crucial observation. A vast amount of recent research concerns empathy – in evolutionary biology, neurobiology, moral psychology, and ethics. I want to extend these investigations by exploring the degree to which individuals can control our empathy: for whom and what we feel ...


[Provocations From The Field] Epistemology Of Ignorance And Human Privilege, Ralph Acampora 2016 Hofstra University

[Provocations From The Field] Epistemology Of Ignorance And Human Privilege, Ralph Acampora

Animal Studies Journal

The article below introduces epistemology of ignorance to animal studies, unearthing various ideologies that legitimate practices of animal exploitation. Factory farming, the slaughterhouse, circuses and zoos, as well as scientific animal research are all investigated for the operation of ideological narratives and images. It is seen that the tropes of Old MacDonald’s farm, Noah’s ark, and the temple of science play pseudo-justifying roles in regards to these institutions. The article concludes that such ideologies of human privilege must be exposed and analyzed for progress to be made in overcoming animal oppression.


Animal Studies Journal 2016 5 (2): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Notes On Contributors And Editorial, Melissa Boyde 2016 University of Wollongong

Animal Studies Journal 2016 5 (2): Cover Page, Table Of Contents, Notes On Contributors And Editorial, Melissa Boyde

Animal Studies Journal

Cover page, table of contents, contributor biographies and editorial for Animal Studies Journal Vol. 5 No.2, 2016.


[Review] Donovan O. Schaefer. Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, And Power. Durham And London: Duke University Press, 2015, Mike Grimshaw 2016 University of Canterbury, New Zealand

[Review] Donovan O. Schaefer. Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, And Power. Durham And London: Duke University Press, 2015, Mike Grimshaw

Animal Studies Journal

Do chimpanzees dance? Or even more particularly, did the chimpanzees of the Kakombe valley, observed by the primatologist Jane Goodall, dance when they approached an eighty-foot waterfall? Furthermore, is this, as Goodall averred, an ‘elemental display’ that could be understood as an originary variant of religious ritual? My six-year old youngest daughter has a deep and varied knowledge of animals, especially wild animals. She is also a dancer, not only of ballet but also jazz and kapa haka (Maori cultural performance). Although pumas are her favourite, her interests constantly expand. So when she asked what I was reading and I ...


[Review] Patricia Sumerling. Elephants And Egotists: In Search Of Samorn Of The Adelaide Zoo. Adelaide: Wakefield Press, 2016, Christine Townend 2016 University of Sydney

[Review] Patricia Sumerling. Elephants And Egotists: In Search Of Samorn Of The Adelaide Zoo. Adelaide: Wakefield Press, 2016, Christine Townend

Animal Studies Journal

This book, as the sub-title suggests, largely concerns the history of an elephant, Samorn, who, as a gift to Australia from the king of Siam, resided at the Adelaide Zoo from 1956 until her death in 1994. The book may appeal to readers who are interested in the way that a zoo works, or in the history of zoos. In places the book offers a great deal of detail, for example long descriptions of the disagreements between ‘egotists’ on the board of the Adelaide Zoo, or about the negotiations to procure Samorn. However, it provides an interesting glimpse into the ...


Gustav Thureau, First Tasmanian Inspector Of Mines And Government Mining Geologist, G. L. McMullen 2016 Australian Catholic University

Gustav Thureau, First Tasmanian Inspector Of Mines And Government Mining Geologist, G. L. Mcmullen

Professional Staff Publications

From humble origins as a rebellious student in Clausthal, Germany, Gustav Thureau became the first Tasmanian Inspector of Mines and Government Mining Geologist. He brought to these offices his experience in Germany, South Australia, Victoria and, briefly, America as a miner, mine manager, lecturer, mining inspector, mining reporter and mining consultant. His 50-year career in mining is interspersed with a number of controversies.


100% Pure Pigs: New Zealand And The Cultivation Of Pure Auckland Island Pigs For Xenotransplantation, Rachel Carr 2016 University of Sydney

100% Pure Pigs: New Zealand And The Cultivation Of Pure Auckland Island Pigs For Xenotransplantation, Rachel Carr

Animal Studies Journal

In 2008, the New Zealand based company Living Cell Technologies (LCT) was granted approval for human clinical trials of animal-to-human transplantation (xenotransplantation) in New Zealand. This was one of the first human clinical trials to go ahead globally following regulatory tightening in the 1990s due to concerns over disease transmission. In response to these disease concerns LCT is using special pigs, isolated on Auckland Island for 200 years and deemed to be the cleanest in the world. This article explores the way that LCT leverages off New Zealand national narratives of purity to market the Auckland Island pigs as safe ...


Killing And Feeling Bad: Animal Experimentation And Moral Stress, Mike R. King 2016 University of Otago

Killing And Feeling Bad: Animal Experimentation And Moral Stress, Mike R. King

Animal Studies Journal

This paper is prompted by the introspective account of animal experimentation provided by Marks in his paper ‘Killing Schrödinger’s Feral Cat’ in this journal. I offer an ethical interpretation of Marks' paper, and add personal reflections based on my own experiences of being involved in animal experimentation. Identifying the emotional and cognitive experiences of Marks and myself with Rollin’s concept of ‘moral stress’ I explore this effect that conducting animal experimentation can have on the people involved. I argue, based partly on personal anecdotal experience, that this stress varies depending on the organisational structure of animal experimentation, and ...


European Honeybee: Interconnectivity At The Edge Of Stillness, Trish Adams 2016 RMIT University, Melbourne

European Honeybee: Interconnectivity At The Edge Of Stillness, Trish Adams

Animal Studies Journal

During an artist residency at the Visual and Sensory Neuroscience Group, Queensland Brain Institute (QBI), art/science practitioner Trish Adams observed a range of experiments. Scientists at the QBI describe on the website that they seek to ‘better understand how the eye and brain solve complex visuomotor tasks’ (Queensland Brain Institute) through investigations into and analysis of the behaviours of the European honeybee. During this residency, Adams’ research project evolved in response to her personal experiences in the largest indoor bee facility in Australia. Here, without protective clothing, Adams was surrounded by the honeybees as they flew around freely in ...


[Review] Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History And Criticism, Katarina Gregersdotter, Johan Höglund And Nicklas HålléN (Eds). Basingstoke And New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015., Kirsty Dunn 2016 University of Canterbury, New Zealand

[Review] Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History And Criticism, Katarina Gregersdotter, Johan Höglund And Nicklas HålléN (Eds). Basingstoke And New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015., Kirsty Dunn

Animal Studies Journal

Animal Horror Cinema: Genre, History and Criticism is the first anthology of academic writing on the animal horror genre. It provides both an historical overview of animal horror cinema as well as a selection of in-depth essays on particularly potent and provocative examples of the genre. The collection as a whole offers a large and varied range of critical analyses and interpretations on the significance of the animal in modern horror film and is a valuable text for critical animal studies and cinema scholars as well as fans of horror film.


Someone Not Something: Dismantling The Prejudicial Barrier In Knowing Animals (And The Grief Which Follows), Teya Brooks Pribac 2016 University of Sydney; The Kerulos Center

Someone Not Something: Dismantling The Prejudicial Barrier In Knowing Animals (And The Grief Which Follows), Teya Brooks Pribac

Animal Studies Journal

Humans’ ideologically informed species segregation in their choice of corporeal comestibles leaves certain animals particularly vulnerable to depersonalisation and devaluation of their individual and social features and competencies. This reflects in the lack of attentional focus on these species in scientific inquiries as well as in the attitude of the general public towards these species, both of which determine political (in)action. With an emphasis on land animals bred and raised to satisfy the feeding and clothing demands of a large part of the human population, this essay explores the motivations and capacities of human rescuers and caregivers to know ...


Elite Indigenous Masculinity In Textual Representations Of Aboriginal Service In The Vietnam War [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman 2016 Australian Catholic University

Elite Indigenous Masculinity In Textual Representations Of Aboriginal Service In The Vietnam War [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

This article analyses three texts that feature Aboriginal soldiers or veterans of the Vietnam War as protagonists: the novel Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys (1999), the play Seems Like Yesterday (2001) and the Redfern Now television episode “The Dogs of War” (2013). In all three texts, military service in Vietnam inculcates among the protagonists sentiments constitutive of what Brendan Hokowhitu refers to as elite Indigenous masculinity—the mimicry and appropriation of white hegemonic masculinity. Constructing themselves as elite Indigenous males allows the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans to position themselves as superior to “other” Aboriginal males. Through the course of the ...


Nothing Happens Here: Songs About Perth, Jon Stratton, Adam Trainer 2016 Independent Scholar, Perth, Australia

Nothing Happens Here: Songs About Perth, Jon Stratton, Adam Trainer

ECU Publications Post 2013

This essay examines Perth as portrayed through the lyrics of popular songs written by people who grew up in the city. These lyrics tend to reproduce the dominant myths about the city: that it is isolated, that it is self-satisfied, that little happens there. Perth became the focus of song lyrics during the late 1970s time of punk with titles such as 'Arsehole of the Universe' and 'Perth Is a Culture Shock'. Even the Eurogliders' 1984 hit, 'Heaven Must Be There', is based on a rejection of life in Perth. However, Perth was also home to Dave Warner, whose songs ...


Transgender Policy In The Australian Defence Force: Medicalization And Its Discontents [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman 2016 Australian Catholic University

Transgender Policy In The Australian Defence Force: Medicalization And Its Discontents [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

In 2010, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) repealed a Defence Instruction that had effectively barred transgender people from serving. Transgender personnel have slowly been coming out since 2010, positioning Australia as an international leader in terms of recognizing the contribution that transgender and gender diverse people can make to military institutions. Yet ADF documents, media reports, and the testimonies of transgender personnel, past and present, suggest a more complex picture of evolving ADF policies toward transgender personnel. This article traces the history of ADF policies toward transgender service and focuses on the medical frameworks deployed. Repealing the ban on transgender ...


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