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Mining Animal Death For All Its Worth, Melissa J. Boyde 2012 University of Wollongong

Mining Animal Death For All Its Worth, Melissa J. Boyde

Melissa Boyde

This chapter considers the death of animals in the novels and film adaptations of Wake in Fright (1961/1971) and Red Dog (2001/2011). Both texts have several things in common: they are set in Australian mining towns – in Wake in Fright it is Bundanyabba, a fictional town with echoes of Broken Hill, New South Wales, and in Red Dog it is Dampier in the Pilbara region of Western Australia – and in both the death of animals is central to the narrative: in Wake in Fright it is the massacre of kangaroos and in Red Dog it is the death ...


Deterring The ‘Boat People’: Explaining The Australian Government's People Swap Response To Asylum Seekers, Jaffa McKenzie, Reza Hasmath 2012 University of Melbourne

Deterring The ‘Boat People’: Explaining The Australian Government's People Swap Response To Asylum Seekers, Jaffa Mckenzie, Reza Hasmath

Reza Hasmath

This article examines why Australia has taken a tough stance on ‘boat people’, through an analysis of the Malaysian People Swap response. The findings support the view that Australia’s asylum seeker policy agenda is driven by populism, wedge politics and a culture of control. The article further argues that these political pressures, in sum, hold numerous negative implications for the tone of Australia’s political debate, the quality of policy formulation, as well as for asylum seekers and refugees themselves.


Trafficking Modernities: Gender And Cultural Authority In The Case Of The Woman Organist, Lilian Frost, Jane Hunt 2012 Bond University

Trafficking Modernities: Gender And Cultural Authority In The Case Of The Woman Organist, Lilian Frost, Jane Hunt

Jane Hunt

According to the local press, Frost as both soloist and accompanist on piano and organ was reported to exhibit a musical maturity beyond her years, and stamina considered unusual for a 'young lady', but clearly this was problematic. Jealous minded organists of the sterner sex are apt to say that ladies cannot play the organ; but the meritorious performance by Miss Frost dispels that illusion; for here is a lady who can play the organ. This appeared to provoke a shift in reportage on Frost's performances: whereas previously newspaper reports repeated an established complimentary four-lined riff, detailed reviews soon ...


Frank The Poet: A Convict'stour To Hell, Mark Gregory 2012 University of Wollongong

Frank The Poet: A Convict'stour To Hell, Mark Gregory

Mark Gregory

August 2012 marks the 151st anniversary of the death of Francis MacNamara, better known in convict Australia as Frank the Poet. According to one of Australia's leading contemporary poets, Les Murray, MacNamara's epic work A Convict's Tour to Hell should be placed right at the beginning of English literature in Australia. Frank’s attitude to the colonial authorities, embodied in this now famous poem, can also be gauged from the punishments he received. Lashed 590 times, he was sent to solitary confinement, to the treadmill, and worked on chain gangs. All through his incarceration, Frank continued to ...


Power For The People, S. A. McHugh 2012 University of Wollongong

Power For The People, S. A. Mchugh

Siobhan McHugh

As part of the Speakers Corner lecture series, award-winning author Siobhan McHugh spoke at the National Archives on 16 August 2009 about her research into the Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Scheme. Through the personal stories of the workers and their families, and drawing on her book, The Snowy: The People Behind the Power, Siobhan shared her insights into the lives of the multinational workforce that built the ‘Snowy’ in post-war Australia.


The Art And Craft Of Radio Documentary: Some Australian Accents., Siobhan A. McHugh 2012 University of Wollongong

The Art And Craft Of Radio Documentary: Some Australian Accents., Siobhan A. Mchugh

Siobhan McHugh

No abstract provided.


The Gift Impossible: Representations Of Child Removal In Australian Children's Literature, 1841-1941, Pamela Scott 2012 Australian Catholic University

The Gift Impossible: Representations Of Child Removal In Australian Children's Literature, 1841-1941, Pamela Scott

Theses

Many in the twenty-first century have become aware of, and incensed at, the childremoval policies of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Yet child removal in Australia has been practised from the time of colonisation, using policies that were brought to Australia from England and modified for colonial society. What is less understood is that child removal has become normalised due, in no small way, to its perpetuation in the social consciousness through the pages of children’s books. Australian authors have inducted their young readership into an adult ideology informed by the beliefs and practices of their own childhood, including ...


"Never Neutral": On Labour History / Radical History, Rowan Cahill 2012 University of Wollongong

"Never Neutral": On Labour History / Radical History, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Eric Fry, one of the founders of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History (ASSLH), wrote about radical history in the ‘Introduction’ to his neglected Rebels & Radicals (1983). The book is not listed in Greg Patmore’s comprehensive listing of labour history publications (1991), rates no mention in the 1992 tribute to Fry’s work edited by Jim Hagan and Andrew Wells, and receives only brief mentions in the Labour History tribute issue to Eric Fry and fellow ASSLH pioneer Bob Gollan (2008). Arguably with good reason, since the book was exploring a different way of writing dissident ...


Review - Michael Tubbs, Asio: The Enemy Within, Rowan Cahill 2012 University of Wollongong

Review - Michael Tubbs, Asio: The Enemy Within, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

ASIO: The Enemy Within is a combative book. Based on his research and experience, Michael Tubbs argues that the Australian Intelligence Security Organisation (ASIO) has no place in Australia’s democracy. According to Tubbs ASIO has, since its formation in 1949, acted as a partisan political secret police force, ridden roughshod over civil liberties, engaged in illegal activities, all with the aim of creating and managing a docile, tranquil public.


Review: People And Politics In Regional New South Wales, Rowan Cahill 2012 University of Wollongong

Review: People And Politics In Regional New South Wales, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Histories of Australian towns and local areas abound, usually the work of enthusiastic local residents distributed through community based museum and historical society networks. Aimed at local audiences, these histories tend to be triumphalist, cataloguing ‘progress’ in terms of population changes and infrastructure growth. There is little in the way of explanation or analysis; local identities appear as a ‘cast of characters’ rather than as flesh and blood historical agents; politics is noticeably absent. For one state, the two volume People & Politics in Regional New South Wales, 1856 to 2006, addresses this political absence. Given the huge size of NSW ...


Review - Pete Thomas, And Greg Mallory (Editor), The Coalminers Of Queensland: A Narrative History Of The Queensland Colliery Employees Union, Volume 2: The Pete Thomas Essays, Rowan Cahill 2012 University of Wollongong

Review - Pete Thomas, And Greg Mallory (Editor), The Coalminers Of Queensland: A Narrative History Of The Queensland Colliery Employees Union, Volume 2: The Pete Thomas Essays, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

In 1986 journalist Pete Thomas published the first volume of his proposed two-volume narrative history of the Queensland Colliery Employees Union, The Coalminers of Queensland. But he died before completing the task. With the support of the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU), Mining and Energy Division (Queensland District Branch), labour historian Greg Mallory has edited Volume 2 from Pete’s unpublished manuscripts.


On Winning The 40 Hour Week, Rowan Cahill 2012 University of Wollongong

On Winning The 40 Hour Week, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The 40-hour week was approved by the Commonwealth Arbitration Court on 8 September 1947, to take effect from 1 January 1948. The 40-hour campaign, the 35-hour campaign that followed in the late 1950s, the 44-hour campaign that preceded these, and union attempts between all three to fix the working week at either 30 or 33 hours, were parts of a long movement for the codification and reduction of Australian working hours that began in the mid 1850s with struggles by workers to establish the principle of the 8-hour day. Stonemasons in Sydney and Melbourne gained the first successes during 1855 ...


Rectifying 'The Great Australian Silence'?: Creative Representations Of Australian Indigenous Second World War Service, Noah Riseman 2012 Australian Catholic University

Rectifying 'The Great Australian Silence'?: Creative Representations Of Australian Indigenous Second World War Service, Noah Riseman

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

Until the publication of Robert Hall's landmark book The Black Diggers in 1989, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were essentially 'written out' of Australia's Second World War history. Still, more than 20 years since the publication of Hall's book, Australian Indigenous participation in the war effort as servicemen and women, labourers and scouts, in wartime industries and in various other capacities, continues to be on the periphery of Australia's war history. The Second World War remains part of what WEH Stanner referred to in 1969 as 'the Great Australian Silence' of Indigenous history. Notwithstanding the ...


The Effects Of Perceived And Actual Distance And Isolation On Australian Ballet Pedagogy 1851-2011, Stephanie Ann Tuley 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder

The Effects Of Perceived And Actual Distance And Isolation On Australian Ballet Pedagogy 1851-2011, Stephanie Ann Tuley

Theatre and Dance Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This thesis explores the relationship between historical developments in Australian ballet pedagogy and conceptions of real and perceived isolation and distance from the West. For 160 years, Australian ballet pedagogues and students have reacted to, constructed, and rejected the importance of the geographical and aesthetic distance between two antipodean points on Earth, one in Australia and the other in England. Isolated from the "Mother Country," British-Australians have simultaneously sought "Britishness" and "Australianness" in their decision to undertake a study of ballet, and in so doing they have embodied complex notions of their postcolonial identities. These identities are explored through an ...


The Other Thing Was...': The Reciprocal Interview Relationship And The Impact Of 'Unconnected' Traumatic Memories, Christin Quirk 2012 Australian Catholic University

The Other Thing Was...': The Reciprocal Interview Relationship And The Impact Of 'Unconnected' Traumatic Memories, Christin Quirk

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

In November 2009 a research project commissioned and funded by the Royal Women's Hospital (RWH), Melbourne, set out to investigate delivery and adoption practices in relation to single women who were confined at the hospital in the period 1945-1975. The RWH was responding to calls from relinquishing mothers to explain its past adoption practices. As a result of the research, the hospital has acknowledged the ongoing trauma and suffering of women who lost a child to adoption, and issued a formal apology.1 Oral history was fundamental to uncovering these past practices and investigating claims that these were unethical ...


Equality In The Ranks: The Lives Of Aboriginal Vietnam Veterans [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Jed Riseman 2012 Australian Catholic University

Equality In The Ranks: The Lives Of Aboriginal Vietnam Veterans [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Jed Riseman

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

When Australia went to war in Vietnam, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people still faced widespread discrimination at home. Various state laws restricted the rights of Australian Indigenous people living "under the Act", while racist community attitudes reinforced discrimination Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people confronted in everyday life. Yet, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men still enlisted in the armed forces and served their country with distinction. This article canvasses some of the issues surrounding race and the Australian armed forces in Vietnam through analysis of oral history interviews with various Aboriginal veterans. Their testimonies suggest that although they ...


Never-Married Women Versus The Records: Archives, Testimony And The History Of Adoption Practices At The Royal Women's Hospital, Christin Quirk 2012 Australian Catholic University

Never-Married Women Versus The Records: Archives, Testimony And The History Of Adoption Practices At The Royal Women's Hospital, Christin Quirk

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

During the period 1945-75, the demand for adoptable babies for infertile couples in Australia was at its peak, with over forty-five thousand adoptions legalised in Victoria alone. At this time, often referred to as the ‘heyday’ of adoption, up to sixty-eight per cent of never-married mothers were separated from their babies. Adoption was characterised as a mutually advantageous solution that guaranteed the moral and social redemption of mother and child, with adoptive parents cast as benevolent and sympathetic. Within this context, mothers who lost a child to adoption were marginalised, stigmatised, and unable to acknowledge their grief and loss. Amid ...


The 'Intrusion Of Women Painters': Ethel Anderson, Modern Art And Gendered Modernities In Interwar Sydney, Australia, Jane Hunt 2011 Bond University

The 'Intrusion Of Women Painters': Ethel Anderson, Modern Art And Gendered Modernities In Interwar Sydney, Australia, Jane Hunt

Jane Hunt

In the interwar period in Sydney, Australia, male art gallery trustees, directors, and art schoolteachers objected to female advocacy and practice of artistic responsiveness to the modern. The dialogue between these two parties has often been interpreted in terms of a margin/centre dichotomy. Closer examination of the case of Ethel Anderson suggests that this model is inadequate. She demonstrated the transnationally apparent predilection of women to infusing civic cultures with the fleeting and every day, thus inverting the spatial cues to cultural authority and presenting a gendered challenge to institutionalised, masculine notions of cultural authority.


Curiosities Or Science In The National Museum Of Victoria: Procurement Networks And The Purpose Of A Museum, Gareth Knapman 2011 Australian National University

Curiosities Or Science In The National Museum Of Victoria: Procurement Networks And The Purpose Of A Museum, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

No abstract provided.


Adelaide And The Birth Of Anzac Day, Gareth Knapman 2011 Australian National University

Adelaide And The Birth Of Anzac Day, Gareth Knapman

Gareth Knapman

No abstract provided.


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