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Transgender Policy In The Australian Defence Force: Medicalization And Its Discontents [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman 2016 Australian Catholic University

Transgender Policy In The Australian Defence Force: Medicalization And Its Discontents [Accepted Manuscript], Noah Riseman

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

In 2010, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) repealed a Defence Instruction that had effectively barred transgender people from serving. Transgender personnel have slowly been coming out since 2010, positioning Australia as an international leader in terms of recognizing the contribution that transgender and gender diverse people can make to military institutions. Yet ADF documents, media reports, and the testimonies of transgender personnel, past and present, suggest a more complex picture of evolving ADF policies toward transgender personnel. This article traces the history of ADF policies toward transgender service and focuses on the medical frameworks deployed. Repealing the ban on transgender ...


Enshrined In Law: Legislative Justifications For The Removal Of Indigenous And Non-Indigenous Children In Colonial And Post-Colonial Australia [Accepted Manuscript], Shurlee Lesley Swain 2016 Australian Catholic University

Enshrined In Law: Legislative Justifications For The Removal Of Indigenous And Non-Indigenous Children In Colonial And Post-Colonial Australia [Accepted Manuscript], Shurlee Lesley Swain

Faculty of Education and Arts Publications

While the completion of two different inquiries, along with separate apologies and reparation packages, might suggest that the policies justifying the removal of Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in Australia were distinct, the situation is far more complex. Both child and ‘native’ welfare were colonial and later state responsibilities, creating the potential for policies and practices to be informed by different forces and to vary by jurisdiction. However, by analysing the debates around legislation from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this article establishes commonalities as well as differences in both the arguments used to justify Indigenous and non-Indigenous child removal ...


Turning Seventy, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Turning Seventy, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The author's ruminations on the occasion of him reaching the age of 70 years old.


The Dale Spender Collection At The Women's College, University Of Sydney, Olivia Murphy 2015 University of Sydney

The Dale Spender Collection At The Women's College, University Of Sydney, Olivia Murphy

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Notice of the opening of the Dale Spender collection of books relating to feminism; Australian women's writing; and women's writing in English of the long nineteenth century.


Radical Academia: Beyond The Audit Culture Treadmill, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving 2015 University of Wollongong

Radical Academia: Beyond The Audit Culture Treadmill, Rowan Cahill, Terry Irving

Rowan Cahill

The pathos of radical academia: notes on the impact of neo-liberalism on the universities, especially the audit culture, the production-model, casualization, academic scholarship, academic writing, peer reviewing, and open access. The authors suggest ways scholars can be radical within, and outside, of neoliberal academia. Part I, 'Missing in Action' appeared as an Academia.edu session in May 2015, where it attracted many comments. Part II, 'What Can Be Done?' is the authors' response to these comments. The whole piece was posted on the Cahill/Irving blog 'Radical Sydney/Radical History' on 22 October 2015.


Liberating Genocide: An Activist Concept And Historical Understanding, Tony Barta 2015 La Trobe University

Liberating Genocide: An Activist Concept And Historical Understanding, Tony Barta

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

From the outset, historians of genocide have seen themselves as activists. Among historians of colonial societies that is what distinguishes them most in relation to indigenous peoples. An ethnographic sensibility should be visible in any such study, and the more so when a question of genocide is raised. After all, if we do not have a sense of difference between peoples we fail the test of genocide at the first hurdle. And if we do not have an ethnographic sensibility towards our own cultures (including academic cultures) we will fail to make the most of our role in affecting deeply ...


Indigenous Institutional Inclusion, Kristy L. Garcia 2015 Gettysburg College

Indigenous Institutional Inclusion, Kristy L. Garcia

Student Publications

While attending James Cook University (JCU) in Cairns, Australia and researching Arizona University (UA) in Tucson, Arizona, I noticed differences concerning the inclusion of Indigenous representation within their educational institutions.While UA focuses on academic education and community outreach through external concentration, JCU focuses on positive cultural awareness and acts of reconciliation through internal concentration. The influence of colonization in both the United States and Australia contributed to the presence, or lack, of tribal sovereignty in Indigenous communities therefore effecting federal recognition, reconciliation, and government funding which ultimately impacted the school systems.


Not Quite Cricket By Jon Rose: A Review, Jane Ulman 2015 University of Wollongong

Not Quite Cricket By Jon Rose: A Review, Jane Ulman

RadioDoc Review

In Not Quite Cricket, Jon Rose reaches into the well-known story of the first Australian cricket team to play at Lords and draws out a tragedy dressed up as music hall comedy, in what he calls a 'historical intervention'.

Rose is an Australian-based polymath creator: a musician, inventor, composer, improviser, educator and entertainer. Radio production is just one strand of his prolific body of work. Over decades he has forged an innovative style, a distinctive radio form. His work has always been a fusion of genres, a hybrid of fact and invention with composed and improvised music carrying its own ...


A Companion To Australian Aboriginal Literature Edited By Belinda Wheeler, JOSE-CARLOS REDONDO-OLMEDILLA 2015 Universidad de Almeria

A Companion To Australian Aboriginal Literature Edited By Belinda Wheeler, Jose-Carlos Redondo-Olmedilla

The Goose

José-Carlos Redondo-Olmedilla reviews A Companion to Australian Aboriginal Literature, edited by Belinda Wheeler.


Denis Kevans: Poet, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Denis Kevans: Poet, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A brief account of the poetry of Australian social movement poet Denis Kevans (1939-2005).


Review Of David Horner,'The Spy Catchers: The Official History Of Asio, 1949-1963', Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 2014, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Review Of David Horner,'The Spy Catchers: The Official History Of Asio, 1949-1963', Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 2014, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Critical review of the officially commissioned history of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) published in 2014.


A Living Tradition, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

A Living Tradition, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Discussion of the seminal work by R. W. Connell and T. H. Irving 'Class Structure in Australian History' (Longman Cheshire, 1980, 1992), and of the tradition of Marxist and class analysis in Australian intellectual life.


Words For Pam, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Words For Pam, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Words spoken by Rowan Cahill at the funeral of his wife, Pam Cahill, 24 June 2015.


Groomed For War, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Groomed For War, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

An account of Australia's preparations for war before 1914, with the focus on the system of compulsory military training for boys and youths introduced in 1911.


Multisport Dreaming: The Foundations Of Triathlon In Australia, Jane Hunt 2015 Bond University

Multisport Dreaming: The Foundations Of Triathlon In Australia, Jane Hunt

Jane Hunt

The sport of triathlon has evolved considerably since the first triathlon-like events were held in Australia in 1980 and 1981. The Australian triathlon journey is full of triumphs. Australia hosted the first Olympic triathlon and the first fully professional race series, and produced wave after wave of age group and elite ITU and Ironman world champions. Australia’s triathlon past is also full of drama, controversy and tragedy. Triathlon has grown so much in such a short time, but in reality, very little is known about the sport’s past. Multisport Dreaming captures a period in time that few remember ...


Revisiting A Struggle: Port Kembla, 1938, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Revisiting A Struggle: Port Kembla, 1938, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

A review and discussion of the 2015 documentary film 'Pig Iron Bob' (Producer/Director Sandra Pires). The focus of this film is the dramatic 2-month long boycott by Australian waterside workers in Port Kembla (NSW), 1938/39, of a cargo of Australian pig-iron bound for Japan. The workers took their action in protest against Japanese militarism and the Sino-Japanese War. The boycott enraged the conservative Australian government of the day which pulled out all stops to maintain its policy of appeasement towards Japan.


Radical History And Labour History, Terry Irving, Rowan Cahill 2015 University of Wollongong

Radical History And Labour History, Terry Irving, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

This piece by Terry Irving and Rowan Cahill was published on their 'Radical Sydney/Radical History' blog (19 February 2015). It welcomes the Radical History Conference (London, 24 March 2015) and reflects on how the political heritage of labour, the original impulse for 'labour history', is energising a new generation of radical historians.


Using Historic Maps From The Congressional Serial Set And Nineteenth Century Collections Online, Bert Chapman 2015 Purdue University

Using Historic Maps From The Congressional Serial Set And Nineteenth Century Collections Online, Bert Chapman

Libraries Faculty and Staff Creative Materials

Historic maps can be used to document all kinds of history: political, military, economic, business, scientific, religious, cultural, genealogy, diplomatic etc. Databases such as ProQuest Congressional and Nineteenth Century Collections Online (NCCO) offer many ways to help users study the past through maps.


Stories Tell Culture Connecting Identity With Place: Australian Cultural Policy And Collective Creativity, Elizabeth E. Slottje 2015 Coffs City Choir

Stories Tell Culture Connecting Identity With Place: Australian Cultural Policy And Collective Creativity, Elizabeth E. Slottje

Journal of Economic and Social Policy

This doctoral research investigates Australian cultural policy in relation to the community arts. The study demonstrates how ‘art’ and ‘culture’ are terms that are applied as interchangeable, disguising aesthetic values, social ideals and economic objectives. An understanding of what is meant by ‘community’ is also revealed to be contested and polemic.

Cultural policy managers and creative practitioners are interviewed and consensus emerges that culture does not require to be mandated. Local government is viewed as most proximate and therefore representative of community arts and cultural aspirations. As a result, local government is increasingly expected to voluntarily commit resources to community ...


Developing Identity As A Light-Skinned Aboriginal Person With Little Or No Community And/Or Kinship Ties, Bindi Bennett 2015 Australian Catholic University

Developing Identity As A Light-Skinned Aboriginal Person With Little Or No Community And/Or Kinship Ties, Bindi Bennett

Theses

Due to Australia's colonisation history, Aboriginal people now have a complex process of both claiming and building a cultural identity, especially if they have light skin. There has been little research into how light-skinned urban Aboriginal people who lack community and/or kinship ties formulate and build their Aboriginal identity. This is an important area to research for the sustainability of the Aboriginal culture and for light-skinned Aboriginal people for now and the future.


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