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Local Wear: A Chat About Textiles & The Body, Emily J. Pascoe 2018 Kansas State University

Local Wear: A Chat About Textiles & The Body, Emily J. Pascoe

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In this presentation, I propose that worn-in garments are a shared aspect of the relationship between humans and textiles, while also being unique to the user. The relationship between natural, cultural, and material forms, resulting in wear on textiles, begins with the human body. The human body is the most universal local. It is the essential qualifier to be a part of the human species. Although it is a biological form, how the body behaves, and the shapes it is molded into, are influenced by culture. The textiles that enclose the body accrue signs of the interactions. Even if the ...


Silk Velvets Identified As Byzantine: Were Warp-Looped Silk Pile Velvets Woven Under The Byzantine Empire?, Sumiyo Okumura 2018 Turkish Cultural Foundation

Silk Velvets Identified As Byzantine: Were Warp-Looped Silk Pile Velvets Woven Under The Byzantine Empire?, Sumiyo Okumura

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper will examine the possibility of whether warp-looped pile velvets, made of silk, were woven during the Byzantine Empire. This study is a continuation of my research for “Velvet and Patronage: the Origin and Historical Background of Ottoman and Italian Velvets.” Research has been conducted under these five themes: 1. Byzantine silk industry; 2. The terminology of velvet in Greek; 3. Velvets in Byzantine written sources; 4. Historical background: the relation between Byzantines and Latin powers, Turks and the Middle East; 5. Latin trade in the Black Sea and 6. Velvet production in Anatolia in the Byzantine period.


The Modern Development Of Kyoto Textiles For The Kimono, Keiko Okamoto 2018 Hosei University

The Modern Development Of Kyoto Textiles For The Kimono, Keiko Okamoto

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Hand painted yūzen dyeing and other types of yūzen dyeing are considered the main dyeing methods among Kyoto textiles. They were developed between the mid-17th century and early 20th century and are still used for the kimono. The kimono and its textiles were spotlighted in Western countries when Japan opened the country to the West in the late 19th century and had been popular into the early 20th century. Westerns collected them, wore them, or used them as motifs of their art works. Japanese also took Western motifs in the kimono textile designs, which in turn ...


The Untold Story Of Inuit Printed Fabrics From Kinngait Studios, Kinngait (Cape Dorset), Nunavut, Canada, Roxane Shaughnessy, Anna Richard 2018 Textile Museum of Canada

The Untold Story Of Inuit Printed Fabrics From Kinngait Studios, Kinngait (Cape Dorset), Nunavut, Canada, Roxane Shaughnessy, Anna Richard

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Textile Museum of Canada holds a collection of close to 200 printed fabrics designed by Inuit artists at Kinngait Studios in Kinngait (Cape Dorset), Nunavut, Canada in the 1950s and 1960s. The pieces are owned by the West Baffin Eskimo Co-operative (WBEC) and are on longterm loan to the Museum. Building on centuries-old Inuit graphic traditions, printmaking was introduced in Kinngait in 1957 as part of a larger initiative to encourage handicraft production for sale in the Canadian south. By the 1960s, the studio had a number of Inuit artists who contributed to the Kinngait Studios’ print program which ...


Along A Continuum: Spirally-Woven Beadwork Of The Tlingit, Wasco, And Pit River Peoples, Alice Scherer 2018 Society of Bead Researchers

Along A Continuum: Spirally-Woven Beadwork Of The Tlingit, Wasco, And Pit River Peoples, Alice Scherer

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This presentation explores the impact of introducing glass beads on the weaving practices of three Pacific Northwest Indigenous groups. Although Native Americans made and used beads of bone, shell, seed, and stone prior to contact with Western European culture, the 18th-century introduction of glass beads brought new elements of sparkle, regularity, and color to native art and inspired creative expressions. Faced with the challenge of integrating these new materials, women turned to familiar basketry techniques for ideas, adapting traditional basket-making methods to weave beads and native-made fibers into bags, caps, straps, and hair ornaments. Visual evidence for this ...


Other People’S Clothes: The Second-Hand Clothes Dealer And The Western Art Collector In Early Twentieth-Century China, Rachel Silberstein 2018 University of Washington

Other People’S Clothes: The Second-Hand Clothes Dealer And The Western Art Collector In Early Twentieth-Century China, Rachel Silberstein

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In Chinese culture, as in many other cultures, new clothes were a powerful symbol of prosperity and beginnings. Yet, with the development of the Qing economy, the second-hand clothes seller (guyi) thrived alongside the pawnshop business to occupy a vital role in the wider system of clothing provisioning: enabling the poor a means of covering their bodies, the privileged an opportunity to liquidate value in clothing possessions, and pretenders a chance to dress their way into different social roles. At the end of the nineteenth century, this established clothing system encountered seismic change, as Western dress systems were introduced, imperial ...


Nd’Awakananawal Babijigwezijik Wd’Elasawawôganôl: “We Wear The Clothing Of Our Ancestors”, Vera Longtoe Sheehan 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Nd’Awakananawal Babijigwezijik Wd’Elasawawôganôl: “We Wear The Clothing Of Our Ancestors”, Vera Longtoe Sheehan

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

When thinking of Native American people, a typical image is of tanned people with long dark hair wearing leather and furs in the distant past, but that is not an accurate depiction of the Abenaki people or their textiles. As an Abenaki scholar, artist, and educator, my research into the textile traditions of the Abenaki people includes archaeological evidence, primary resources, and oral history interviews. Abenakis themselves have different ideas of what it traditional because textile and fiber arts evolved over many millennia throughout N’dakinna, the Abenaki homeland which once encompassed Vermont, New Hampshire, northern Massachusetts, and parts of ...


Tapestry Crochet In The Americas, Europe, Africa, And The Middle East: Tradition And Innovation, Carol Ventura 2018 Tennessee Technological University

Tapestry Crochet In The Americas, Europe, Africa, And The Middle East: Tradition And Innovation, Carol Ventura

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Tapestry crochet was historically done in just a few countries, but globalization and the internet have spread this versatile art form around the world. Publications and online groups have helped keep this tradition alive and have inspired many innovative uses-from designer accessories to contemporary museum installations. Tapestry crocheted fabric is solid and smooth with motifs and imagery, much like tapestry woven cloth. Because of the similar look and feel, most people cannot tell the difference between the two. Techniques vary from place to place, perhaps because they developed from different types of looped bags, gloves, and bags. For instance, in ...


Symposium 2018 -- Program & Information: The Social Fabric: Deep Local To Pan Global Textile Society Of America’S 16th Biennial Symposium, 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Symposium 2018 -- Program & Information: The Social Fabric: Deep Local To Pan Global Textile Society Of America’S 16th Biennial Symposium

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The theme of TSA’s 16th Biennial Symposium is The Social Fabric: Deep Local to Pan Global. Located on the Pacific Rim, Vancouver offers a pertinent setting to probe the impact and influence of settlers and immigration on an already long-inhabited land, and how textile traditions have been influenced, changed, and/or adapted through and by cultural contact. In 2014 Vancouver city council unanimously voted to acknowledge that the city is on un-ceded Aboriginal territory, creating fertile ground for this conversation. We invite participants to examine textiles within the context of the “Deep Local,” defined as knowledge, beliefs, resources, and ...


Warp And Weft Twining, And Tablet Weaving Around The Pacific, Tomoko Torimaru, Kathryn Rousso, Laura Filloy Nadal, Alejandro de Ávila B 2018 Museo Nacional de Antropología, INAH, Mexico

Warp And Weft Twining, And Tablet Weaving Around The Pacific, Tomoko Torimaru, Kathryn Rousso, Laura Filloy Nadal, Alejandro De Ávila B

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Warp and weft twining predates loom-woven textiles in the archaeological record. Although it was displaced by other techniques to produce fabric in areas where it is recorded from early times, such as Egypt, this particular approach to building woven structures is still maintained in scattered areas around the world as part of local traditions with deep significance in ritual and festive life, as well in the heavy subsistence work of agricultural and hunting/fishing communities.

In this roundtable, we propose to describe, illustrate and compare warp and weft twined, and tablet woven textiles from Central America, Mexico, Canada, Alaska, China ...


Threading Together Politics And Poetics In Cecilia Vicuña’S Fiber Art, Jacqueline Witkowski 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Threading Together Politics And Poetics In Cecilia Vicuña’S Fiber Art, Jacqueline Witkowski

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In 2006, Chilean artist Cecelia Vicuña carried thick knotted red strands of unspun wool to Cerro El Plomo, a glaciated peak outside of Santiago. Done in response to government-sanctioned acquisitions of gold and silver mines sitting under the glacier by a Canadian corporation, Vicuña’s use of her quipu-an ancient mnemonic device-tied the historical disappearance of the Incan empire to an ecological devastation occurring in the new millennium. Her actions also referenced the Pinochet dictatorship, as well as her own exile when in 1979, she traveled to Colombia and with a red string tied to a glass of milk, spilled ...


Sanquhar Gloves: An Exemplification Of Deep Local To Pan Global?, Angharad Thomas 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Sanquhar Gloves: An Exemplification Of Deep Local To Pan Global?, Angharad Thomas

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Hand knitted gloves with unique patterning have been produced in the small Scottish town of Sanquhar for probably 200 years. They continue to be produced there today, demonstrating a “deep local” presence spanning many generations. Meanwhile, knowledge of the gloves has spread globally, including the English-speaking world as well as Europe and Scandinavia. Aided by modern social media they have become “pan global” as exemplified in the author’s blog documenting “The Glove Project” (https:knittinggloves.wordpress.com/), the Ravelry group dedicated to Sanquhar knitting (http://www.ravelry.com/groups/sanquhar-knitting-group) and an ongoing online exhibition for the Center for ...


The Wagga Quilt In History And Literature, Diana Mary Eva Thomas 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The Wagga Quilt In History And Literature, Diana Mary Eva Thomas

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

The Wagga quilt fits squarely into the Australian tradition of ‘making do.’ These quilts were constructed from recycled materials that were available at the time-for the shearer or drover that was wheat sacks, for the poor family on the land it was clothing that could no longer be worn because it was too threadbare, for Depression-era women it was the samples that tailors or fabric salesmen no longer needed. But Waggas are not only the products of hardship on the land. Many of the surviving quilts were used in homes in reginal towns or the suburbs or large cities such ...


Looking At The Past And Current Status Of Kenya’S Clothing And Textiles, Mercy V.W. Wanduara 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Looking At The Past And Current Status Of Kenya’S Clothing And Textiles, Mercy V.W. Wanduara

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper analyzes and documents traditional textiles and clothing of the Kenyan people before and after independence in 1963. The paper is based on desk top research and face to face interviews from senior Kenyan citizens who are familiar with Kenyan traditions. An analysis of some of the available Kenya’s indigenous textile fiber plants is made and from which a textile craft basket is made. Kenya’s textile and clothing industry has undergone tremendous changes from pre-colonial era (before 1963) to date. Traditionally Kenyans donned clothing made out locally available materials; namely plants and animal skin. Color for these ...


The Lévite Dress: Untangling The Cultural Influences Of Eighteenth-Century French Fashion, Kendra Van Cleave 2018 San Francisco State University

The Lévite Dress: Untangling The Cultural Influences Of Eighteenth-Century French Fashion, Kendra Van Cleave

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

During the final decades of the eighteenth century, France saw a massive vogue for women’s clothing styles that, while adhering to the fundamental norms of French dress, were directly influenced by Ottoman clothing. One of the most popular of these was the levite, a dress that was introduced in the late 1770s and continued in popularity through the late 1780s. Inspired by costumes worn in a staging of Racine’s play “Athalie,” which is set in the ancient Biblical era, the levite initially mimicked the lines of Middle Eastern caftans. Over time, the style developed into at least three ...


The Global Influence Of China And Europe On Local Japanese Tapestries Mainly From The 19th Through Early 20th Centuries, Masako Yoshida 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

The Global Influence Of China And Europe On Local Japanese Tapestries Mainly From The 19th Through Early 20th Centuries, Masako Yoshida

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

In general, Japanese culture has developed under the influence of foreign cultures, and textiles are no exception. In this presentation, I will focus on tapestries from the 19th century (the late Edo period) to the early 20th century (the Showa period), and discuss how Japanese tapestries achieved their original expression under the influence of Chinese and European tapestries. The Japanese began to seriously produce tapestry weaving around the end of the Edo period, but in the beginning, they just copied Chinese and European tapestries. Regarding these early productions, little research has been accomplished yet. In this presentation, I ...


Mashru Redux: From The Calico Museum In Ahmedabad To A Loom In The Great Plains, Wendy R. Weiss 2018 University of Nebraska

Mashru Redux: From The Calico Museum In Ahmedabad To A Loom In The Great Plains, Wendy R. Weiss

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

A zigzag line of resist dye characterizes a fabric called Mashru. It was produced in several different geographic locations; however, this paper discusses examples from India and my efforts to reconstruct patterns that have not been actively produced in this century. The Calico Museum in Ahmedabad is the first place I saw this style of warp resist fabric. The literature says that it was produced for Muslim clients who were not allowed to wear silk next to their skin. The word “Mashru” means “permitted” in Arabic and its Sanskrit variation “Misru” means “mixed.” A mashru fabric historically has a silk ...


Getting Located: Queer Semiotics In Dress, C. Zimmerman 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Getting Located: Queer Semiotics In Dress, C. Zimmerman

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

From the effeminate Macarconis of the 18th century to the “future is female” shirts of 2017, the fashioned body has conveyed desire, signaled safety, and helped build affinity for queer people. This project will take the shape of a deep excavation and careful consideration of the historical precedence of queers encoding the nuances of dress with a multitude of identity affirming and identity challenging practices. Predominant research on unearthing how queer culture was (and is) expressed through dress had focused on the discernible gestures of normative gay male bodies; from ‘flagging’ (i.e. adorning the body with objects such ...


Cottage Industry As Social Practice: Sustainability Of Handweaving In The Post-Industrialist Era, Maggie Leininger 2018 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Cottage Industry As Social Practice: Sustainability Of Handweaving In The Post-Industrialist Era, Maggie Leininger

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

India to Appalachia: How Cottage Industries Preserve Textile Heritage examines the role of the hand weaver and the cottage industry from India to the American Craft Revival in promoting cultural identity through textiles. The migratory nature of textile production both in the pre-and post-industrial practices has long challenged the notion of a pure textile heritage for any culture. However, with the almost simultaneous appearance of Khadi production in India and the American Craft Revival of Appalachia, the allure of the homespun as a cultural asset became a mechanism to offset the impact of textile industrialization. As urban centers increased in ...


Mind’S Eye And Embodied Weaving: Simultaneous Contrasts Of Hue In Isluga Textiles, Northern Chile, Penelope Dransart 2018 University of Aberdeen

Mind’S Eye And Embodied Weaving: Simultaneous Contrasts Of Hue In Isluga Textiles, Northern Chile, Penelope Dransart

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This article examines the use of hue in textiles woven during the twentieth century in Isluga, a bilingual Aymara/Spanish-speaking community of herders of llamas, alpacas and sheep in the highlands of northern Chile. It pays tribute to the weaving skills of Natividad Castro Challapa and other weavers of her generation, born early in the twentieth century. Aniline dyes were already known to them but, in the course of their lives, they witnessed increasing amounts of industrially manufactured, pre-dyed acrylic yarns arriving in the community. The article explores how weavers incorporated these brightly hued yarns in their textiles to form ...


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