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Interview With Helen Shiller, Jacob Martin Lingan 2010 Columbia College Chicago

Interview With Helen Shiller, Jacob Martin Lingan

Chicago Anti-Apartheid Movement

Length: 50 minutes

Interview of Helen Shiller by Jacob Martin Lingan


Interview With Danny Davis, Terence Sims 2010 Columbia College - Chicago

Interview With Danny Davis, Terence Sims

Chicago Anti-Apartheid Movement

Length: 67 minutes

Interview of Danny Davis by Terence Sims


Poetics Of Resistance: Ecocritical Reading Of Ojaide’S Delta Blues & Home Songss And Daydream Of Ants And Other Poem, UZOECHI NWAGBARA 2010 GREENWICH SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT LONDON

Poetics Of Resistance: Ecocritical Reading Of Ojaide’S Delta Blues & Home Songss And Daydream Of Ants And Other Poem, Uzoechi Nwagbara

Dr Uzoechi Nwagbara

ABSTRACT Nigerian written poetry spans about six decades, from its inception, and has been a medium of engagement, decrying colonialism, cultural imperialism, socio-economic oppression and political tyranny. Tanure Ojaide’s poetic enterprise follows in the footsteps of this mould of interdiction, which can be called resistance poetics. Particularly, his collections of poetry, Delta Blues & Home Songs and Daydream of Ants and Other Poems, are illustrations of ecocritical literature. Ecocriticism in literature is a form of aesthetics that concerns itself with the nature of relationship between literature and the natural environment. Ojaide considers the ecocritical art of poetry as a kind ...


Can You Really See Through A Squint? Theoretical Underpinnings In The 'Our Sister Killjoy', Cheryl Sterling 2010 NYU

Can You Really See Through A Squint? Theoretical Underpinnings In The 'Our Sister Killjoy', Cheryl Sterling

Cheryl Sterling

Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our Sister Killjoy is read as an inversion of the colonial travel narrative, addressing the continued asymmetrical power relations between Europe and Africa. The paper posits Sissie, its focal character, as a site of theoretical transformations, engaging with issues of racial subjectivity, sexuality and political positionality in relation to the neo-colonial African state. It further argues that Aidoo situates a performative self in the text through an interrogatory narrative voice that succeeds in both deforming the novelistic pattern and participating in the critique of Western subjectivity and hegemonic feminist positioning, while inserting a resistant feminist ideology ...


Women-Space, Power And The Sacred In Afro-Brazilian Culture, Cheryl Sterling 2010 NYU

Women-Space, Power And The Sacred In Afro-Brazilian Culture, Cheryl Sterling

Cheryl Sterling

This article places Afro-Brazilian women in the midst of the discourse of globalization, in light of its impact on marginalizing women of color, economically, politically, and culturally. It extends the concept of globalizing discourses to the history of enslavement and the racialist policies in Brazilian society, as seen in its policy of embranquecimento and the myth of Brazil as a racial democracy. The article then analyzes the historic and present day role of Afro-Brazilian women in the religious tradition of Candomblé, focusing on one public festival in particular, the festa for the Yoruba-based orixá, Obaluaye, in Salvador da Bahia. It ...


Ogbuu-Kay! The "After Laugh" Lingers On, Chukwuma Azuonye 2010 University of Massachusetts Boston

Ogbuu-Kay! The "After Laugh" Lingers On, Chukwuma Azuonye

Africana Studies Faculty Publication Series

Memorial Tribute to Ogbu Uke Kalu, 1942-2009.


The African Roots Of Michael Echeruo’S Poetry: A Close-Reading Of ‘Sophia’, Chukwuma Azuonye 2010 University of Massachusetts Boston

The African Roots Of Michael Echeruo’S Poetry: A Close-Reading Of ‘Sophia’, Chukwuma Azuonye

Africana Studies Faculty Publication Series

This paper argues that, contrary to widespread opinion, the poetry of first generation, postcolonial, modernist Nigerian poet, Michael J. C. Echeruo, draws some of its core and defining tropes from indigenous African system of thought and symbolism. The much maligned early poem "Sophia" is subjected to line-by-line close-reading to illustrate this argument. The analysis suggests that, as a matter of fact, "Sophia" can be read as a portal to Echeruo's poetic corpus as a whole.


Ghana Journey: Private Investment, Public Funding, And Domestic Reform, Ronald C. Griffin 2010 Florida A & M University College of Law

Ghana Journey: Private Investment, Public Funding, And Domestic Reform, Ronald C. Griffin

Journal Publications

Some folks are good. But man is evil. He is driven by impulses, avarice, reason, scholarship, and barbarism. Ghana's history affirms some of the social and philosophical claims about man and evil. A scholarly narrative about American economic life, trenched in Ghana like an overlay, will unveil bits about big businesses, small businesses, and doing business in Ghana.


Achebe's Igbo Poems: Oral Traditional Resources And The Process Of ‘Deschooling’ In Modern African Poetics, Chukwuma Azuonye 2010 University of Massachusetts Boston

Achebe's Igbo Poems: Oral Traditional Resources And The Process Of ‘Deschooling’ In Modern African Poetics, Chukwuma Azuonye

Africana Studies Faculty Publication Series

The present paper examines the diction, imagery and other features of language and style in Chinua Achebe's two Igbo poems ("Uno Onwu Okigbo" and "Akuko Kpulu Uwa Iru"). Disposing of charges of plagiarism levied on Achebe on account of his modeling of the poems on well-known Igbo folk songs, the paper argues that what is rather involved in the compositional process is a process of "deschooling" from the strictures of European or Eurocentric conventions of versification. It concludes that a process of "deschooling" of this kind is one way in which African writers can begin their journey back with ...


South Sudan: A Fledgling Nation, Alka Jauhari 2010 Sacred Heart University

South Sudan: A Fledgling Nation, Alka Jauhari

Government Faculty Publications

The citizens of south Sudan are rejoicing in the hope of building a new nation after the referendum next year. They are hoping to finally gain independence from the north and thus create an independent and a prosperous south Sudan. However, prosperity of a nation depends on a number of factors which are conspicuously absent in the case of south Sudan. These include existence of a socially cohesive society and a basic social and economic infrastructure. A socially cohesive society is essential to pave the way for a genuine democracy, while the presence of basic infrastructure provides the institutional base ...


Africa, The New African Diaspora, And Religious Transnationalism In A Global World, James V. Spickard, Afe Adogame 2010 University of Redlands

Africa, The New African Diaspora, And Religious Transnationalism In A Global World, James V. Spickard, Afe Adogame

Our House Book Chapters and Sections

This introductory chapter accomplishes two tasks. First, it identifies seven different approaches to the study of religion and immigration, outlining the ways that each of these both reveals and limits transnational religious dynamics in the current era. Second, it summarizes each of the chapters of this book, identifying their major themes and how they, together, reveal multiple aspects of African-based transnational religious phenomena.


Re-Hybridizing Transnational Domesticity And Femininity: Women’S Contemporary Filmmaking And Lifewriting In France, Algeria, And Tunisia, Stacey Weber-Fève 2010 Iowa State University

Re-Hybridizing Transnational Domesticity And Femininity: Women’S Contemporary Filmmaking And Lifewriting In France, Algeria, And Tunisia, Stacey Weber-Fève

World Languages and Cultures Books

Re-hybridizing Transnational Domesticity and Femininity examines the problems of voicing the personal when considering the role and place of women in the home. Analyzing a collection of first-person cinematic and literary narratives by Assia Djebar, Annie Ernaux, Simone de Beauvoir, Raja Amari, Coline Serreau, Leïla Sebbar, and Yamina Benguigui; Weber-Fève explores the transnational processes of identity formation, gender performance, and construction of culture and society. Through a closer look at contemporary representations of French, Algerian, and Tunisian women on the page and on the screen, this study discusses the ways in which homemaking, nation, and gender are intricately bound to ...


William Shakespeare And Chinua Achebe: A Study Of Character And The Supernatural, Kenneth N. Usongo 2010 University of Denver

William Shakespeare And Chinua Achebe: A Study Of Character And The Supernatural, Kenneth N. Usongo

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This study examines how Shakespeare and Achebe use supernatural devices such as prophecies, dreams, beliefs, divinations and others to create complex characters. Even though these features are indicative of the preponderance of the belief in the supernatural by some people of the Elizabethan, Jacobean and traditional Igbo societies, Shakespeare and Achebe primarily use the supernatural to represent the states of mind of their protagonists.

Through an essentially New Historicist approach to the study of character and the supernatural in the tragedies and novels of Shakespeare and Achebe respectively, I argue that both writers, besides using supernatural features to explore the ...


Housework And Dance As Counterpoints In French-Tunisian Filmmaker Raja Amari's Satin Rouge, Stacey Weber-Fève 2010 Iowa State University

Housework And Dance As Counterpoints In French-Tunisian Filmmaker Raja Amari's Satin Rouge, Stacey Weber-Fève

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, when an independent, postcolonial Tunisia emerged from under French colonial rule and began to engage in “modernized” nation-building practices, questions addressing the role of Tunisian women (and more importantly their image in this “new,” postcolonial and independent society) took precedence. Many political, artistic, and intellectual figures were concerned with how Tunisian women’s images were constructed in the public eye, in the arts, and in the media. These concerns led to a variety of reformist thoughts during this nationalist movement (and even still today), but all postulations appeared to coalesce in the perceived ...


Laying Bare The Sins Of The Father: Exploring White Fathers In Post-Apartheid Literature, Casey M. Reck 2010 Claremont McKenna College

Laying Bare The Sins Of The Father: Exploring White Fathers In Post-Apartheid Literature, Casey M. Reck

CMC Senior Theses

This Thesis is an exploration of white fathers in three post-apartheid novels: Mark Behr's The Smell of Apples, Nadine Gordimer's The House Gun, and J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace. By examining the link between private white hegemonic masculinity and the apartheid government, the Thesis analyzes the transitional process as these men try to adopt less authoritative identities.


Toward A Grounded Theory On The Management Of Orphanages In South Africa And Zimbabwe, Anna Siyavora 2010 Walden University

Toward A Grounded Theory On The Management Of Orphanages In South Africa And Zimbabwe, Anna Siyavora

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

The number of orphaned children in many parts of Africa is increasing as their parents die from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The research problem addressed in this qualitative study was lack of understanding by others about how the managers of orphanages in 2 African countries -- South Africa and Zimbabwe - were responding to the emotional and social needs of these orphans. The purpose of this study was to develop an orphanage management theory or model that could replicate the African kinship environment in the orphanages under study. Nurturing leadership theory provided the conceptual backdrop for ...


The Impact Of Stakeholder Collaboration On Effectiveness Of Health Program Implementation In Ghana, Samuel Kwami Agbanu 2010 Walden University

The Impact Of Stakeholder Collaboration On Effectiveness Of Health Program Implementation In Ghana, Samuel Kwami Agbanu

Walden Dissertations and Doctoral Studies

Healthcare providers increasingly recognize the importance of collaboration among stakeholders in cost-effective healthcare delivery. While collaborative relationships offer great advantages, little research has addressed their relevance in an international development aid context, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The region is a major recipient of international development support, yet health indicators on HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and child and maternal mortality indicate the health of the region is among the weakest worldwide. This sequential mixed method, descriptive study of a USAID-funded community health program in Ghana examined the nature of collaboration among six stakeholders and impact of this collaboration on effectiveness of ...


“Foreword”, Marc Prou 2009 University of Massachusetts Boston

“Foreword”, Marc Prou

Marc E. Prou

The Haitian Creole Language is the first book that deals broadly with a language that has too long lived in the shadow of French. With chapters contributed by the leading scholars in the study of Creole, it provides information on this language's history; structure; and use in education, literature, and social interaction. Although spoken by virtually all Haitians, Creole was recognized as the co-official language of Haiti only a little over twenty years ago. The Haitian Creole Language provides essential information for professionals, other service providers, and Creole speakers who are interested in furthering the use of Creole in ...


The African Roots Of Michael Echeruo’S Poetry: A Close-Reading Of ‘Sophia’, Chukwuma Azuonye 2009 University of Massachusetts Boston

The African Roots Of Michael Echeruo’S Poetry: A Close-Reading Of ‘Sophia’, Chukwuma Azuonye

Chukwuma Azuonye

This paper argues that, contrary to widespread opinion, the poetry of first generation, postcolonial, modernist Nigerian poet, Michael J. C. Echeruo, draws some of its core and defining tropes from indigenous African system of thought and symbolism. The much maligned early poem "Sophia" is subjected to line-by-line close-reading to illustrate this argument. The analysis suggests that, as a matter of fact, "Sophia" can be read as a portal to Echeruo's poetic corpus as a whole.


Achebe's Igbo Poems: Oral Traditional Resources And The Process Of ‘Deschooling’ In Modern African Poetics, Chukwuma Azuonye 2009 University of Massachusetts Boston

Achebe's Igbo Poems: Oral Traditional Resources And The Process Of ‘Deschooling’ In Modern African Poetics, Chukwuma Azuonye

Chukwuma Azuonye

The present paper examines the diction, imagery and other features of language and style in Chinua Achebe's two Igbo poems ("Uno Onwu Okigbo" and "Akuko Kpulu Uwa Iru"). Disposing of charges of plagiarism levied on Achebe on account of his modeling of the poems on well-known Igbo folk songs, the paper argues that what is rather involved in the compositional process is a process of "deschooling" from the strictures of European or Eurocentric conventions of versification. It concludes that a process of "deschooling" of this kind is one way in which African writers can begin their journey back with ...


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